Urba002
Re-imagining utopian and dystopian cities: urban tensions and transformations

Convenors:
Anita Sujoldžić (Institute for Anthropological Research)
Anja Iveković Martinis (Institute for Anthropological Research)
Stream:
Urban
Location:
A122
Start time:
22 June, 2015 at 10:30
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This panel will present papers that share a common concern with anxieties and creative tensions of cities in changing political, economic, social and cultural circumstances. Cities are seen as sites of plurality, while the overall focus is on how the co-existence of different perspectives and practices is shaped by and how it in turn shapes the physical and social space of the city.

Long abstract:

This panel, set up ad hoc of individually received abstracts, will present papers that share a common concern with anxieties and creative tensions of cities in changing political, economic, social and cultural contexts. The papers examine and illuminate an array of urban circumstances, trajectories and issues, through case studies of different world cities seen as sites of a plurality of ideologies, communities, identities, spatial regimes and political subjects, implying also a plurality of ways of representing and engaging with the city itself. The overall focus is on how the co-existence of different perspectives and practices is shaped by and how it in turn shapes the physical and social space of the city. The theoretically quite diverse background informing the authors’ reflections is at the same time a challenge to and a promise of an informed discussion on issues related to contemporary regimes of city governmentality, the problematic tension between the city as a site of social progress as well as exclusion and injustice, as a site of tradition and heritage and futuristic visions or as a location of creative experimentation as well as destruction. The papers will analyze how contrasts, protests, movements and transformations result from social diversity and heterogeneity and how they reconfigure cities through spatial appropriation and social belonging.