Food001
Culinary heritage as an island of well-being (Panel of SIEF working groups 'Historical approaches in cultural analysis' and 'Food research')

Convenors:
Michaela Fenske (Universit├Ąt W├╝rzburg)
Patricia Lysaght (University College Dublin)
Hanna Snellman (University of Helsinki)
Stream:
Food
Location:
A218
Start time:
22 June, 2015 at 10:30
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

The SIEF working groups "Historical Approaches in Cultural Analysis" and "Food Research" invite contributions dealing with the utopian dimensions of culinary cultures past and present.

Long abstract:

Today, we witness a revival of historical cooking knowledge. The ways our grandmother prepared food - her recipes for cooking as well as her knowledge about preserving fruit and vegetables - are becoming popular once more. Cooking and eating as methods of supplying a new life to heritage seem to be islands of well-being in the contemporary everyday world, and well-being is a starting point in the search for a good life. The SIEF working groups "Historical Approaches in Cultural Analysis" and "Food Research" invite contributions dealing with the utopian dimensions of culinary cultures past and present. In which periods and for which reasons did people use a specific culinary heritage to reflect their ways of and aspirations about living? How did, and how does culinary heritage become an element in the managing and forming of the future? Is culinary heritage also perceived as a method of survival in times of high unemployment? Is grandmother's culinary advice more valuable in economically unstable periods than during better times? When cooking - how do practitioners employ the senses and bodily needs to reflect on and discuss worldviews, social roles, norms and ideas? How is knowledge about cooking preserved, transferred, performed and narrated? etc. From a methodological perspective, we anticipate that contributors will present an analysis of historical sources such as handwritten or printed cookbooks, historical menus, or other methods of historical research. Empirical studies of today's practices will also be welcome.