P32
Theorizing heritage fractures, divides and gaps

Convenors:
Ewa Klekot (University of Warsaw)
Cristina Sanchez-Carretero (CSIC)
Location:
Ülikooli 16, 214
Start time:
1 July, 2013 at 10:30
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

We invite contributions to analyze and theorize the fractures, divides and gaps linked to both research on heritagization and to the practice and/or management of heritage-related processes. The goal is to move beyond the criticism of these gaps and to conduct research on the divides themselves.

Long abstract:

This panel seeks contributions to analyze and theorize the fractures, divides and gaps that are linked to both research on heritagization and to the practice and/or management of heritage-related processes. Some of these fractures are related to the parallel realities in which researchers on heritage and managers of heritage -and policy makers- are immersed. A second type of divide is linked to the distance between those who understand heritage as socially constructed and those who continue having the perspective that heritage are things, a position named "substantialism" by Davallon (2010). Although a critical turn in heritage studies has been proposed for more than two decades (Kirshenblatt-Gimblett 1995, Hufford 1994, Prats 2005, Smith 2006), substantialists continue to have a dominant role in the authorized heritage discourse (Smith 2006). Another divide is related to the distance between heritage policies and local participation in heritagization processes. There is also an ethical divide resulting from the emancipatory potential of heritage, which is manifested in memory activism, and its commodification. In this panel, we seek contributions that move beyond the criticism of these gaps and conduct research on the divides themselves. The session invites provocative and challenging contributions from critical heritage studies to pursue theoretical directions on the fractures of heritagization processes. We are particularly interested in bringing together crossdisciplinary points of view from historians, anthropologists, folklorists, ethnologist, architects, archaeologists, museologists or ethnomusicologists; as well as "practitioners" of heritage-related fields, such as NGOs, community centers, policy-making institutions or museums.