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SIEF2013 11th Congress: Tartu, Estonia.
30 June - 4 July, 2013

SIEF2013: Circulation

Tartu, Estonia; 30th June - 4th July

(P05)

Teaching historical-ethnological approaches to the past

Location Ülikooli 16, 215
Date and Start Time 01 July, 2013 at 10:30

Convenors

Michaela Fenske (Universität Würzburg) email
Pauliina Latvala-Harvilahti (The Finnish Literature Society) email
Mail All Convenors

Short Abstract

The Working Group on Historical Approaches in Cultural Analysis invites its members and interested colleagues to reflect on teaching methods and contents in historical-ethnological approaches. The panel aims for an exchange of knowledge, experiences, ideas and concepts.

Long Abstract

The Working Group on Historical Approaches in Cultural Analysis invites its members and interested colleagues from a variety of disciplines and working contexts - including Cultural Anthropology, Ethnology, Folklore Studies, Cultural Heritage Studies, History, and Cultural Geography - to reflect our teaching contents and methods in historical-ethnological approaches. How do we teach our students the study of everyday life in the past? Which methods and approaches in historical analysis are important for a solid historical orientation, and how do we communicate them to students? Which knowledge is circulating in this context, which information, values and images are or should be important for us? Which topics do we prefer?

We call for presentations that propose useful ways of teaching and solutions for methodological problems, raise theoretical and practical questions in generating curricula or/and discuss values and other ethical questions linked with the topic. The panel aims to bring together different teaching cultures and traditions and to discuss the application of methods and attitudes in a variety of fields like palaeography, heuristics, hermeneutics, so called "fieldwork in archives", and oral history. The panel aims for an international and interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge, experiences, ideas and concepts.

This panel is closed to new paper proposals.

Papers

"The best experience in this course was to meet Luise": teaching historical approaches to students of cultural anthropology/European ethnology

Author: Michaela Fenske (Universität Würzburg)  email

Short Abstract

My paper will discuss my experience in teaching a basic course on historical analyses. Particular emphasis will be placed on the “methodological imagination and pedagogical skills” that are particularly relevant for the present panel.

Long Abstract

Teaching historical approaches to students of Cultural Anthropology/European Ethnology/Folkloristics implies various challenges. In teaching a recent course, it was by coincidence that I discovered a fascinating possibility of bringing together the requirements of the course and the joy. Essentially, my approach offered a personal approach by combining different resources. In offering documents, material findings and photographs of Luise, a young educated woman who lived at the end of the 19th century, I invited students to reflect bourgeois culture and female lives of the past as well as sources and methods of historical study. The enthusiastic response I received for this approach made me understand how important it is to offer aspects of "real lives" in addition to historical sources that present-day students might find it difficult to relate to.

Current topics in the 18th century

Author: Burkhard Pöttler (University of Graz)  email

Short Abstract

To raise students' interest in historical approaches to everyday culture the selection of topics which correspond to current problems is very helpful. Laying stress on differences and similarities in time rather than space helps to expand the ethnological understanding to historical approaches.

Long Abstract

To raise students' interest in historical approaches to everyday culture the selection of topics which correspond to current problems has proven to be very helpful. For example, the public discourse on beggars in Graz and the respective legislation is a good entrance to the study of archival material concerning beggars and their prosecution in the 18th century. Similarly, the actual interest in spirituality opens the way to books of miracles as a source for piety and religious believes in that period.

As a prerequisite to an understanding of historical sources there are two aspects which mainly have to be dealt with: On a more practical level there is the necessity to acquire skills in reading old hand writings (in this case especially the "Kurrentschrift"). By many students it is regarded as so dominating that it often becomes a kind of label for the introductory course to historical methods. On the cognitive level questions of methodology and theoretical concepts adopted from history have to be combined with the ethnographically oriented concepts like "fieldwork in the archives" and "historical ethnography". Laying stress on differences and similarities in time rather than in space helps students to apply their knowledge of ethnological concepts to the temporal dimension, thus facilitating historical approaches to everyday culture.

Maritime history and exploratory learning

Author: Tytti Steel (University of Helsinki)  email

Short Abstract

In my paper I will share my experiences of applying exploratory learning as a method of teaching maritime history. The paper is based on my work at the Maritime History Studies at the University of Helsinki. I will reflect on how exploratory learning can rise to the challenge of multidisciplinary teaching.

Long Abstract

In my paper I will share my experiences of applying exploratory learning as a method of teaching maritime history. The paper is based on my work as a teacher at the multidisciplinary Maritime History Studies at the University of Helsinki.

I will discuss the pros and cons of exploratory learning as a method in teaching a group of students whose previous studies can vary quite a lot.

Maritime History Studies at the University of Helsinki is a multidisciplinary minor, with the strongest emphasis on maritime archaeology, maritime ethnology and maritime history. In practice, the multidisciplinary characteristics aren't always easy to conduct. In my paper, I will reflect on how exploratory learning can rise to this challenge.

In addition to the concept of exploratory learning, constructive alignment of teaching is an important aspect in my presentation. How can these pedagogical concepts help teachers dealing with historical-ethnological approaches to the past?

From "the moral economy of the English crowd" to "moral economies of science" and beyond: ethnology and its challenges for the history of science

Author: Julian Bauer (University of Konstanz)  email

Short Abstract

The talk focuses on a. recent origins of approaching the past with an ethnological sensibility in British Marxist historiography, b. Lorraine Daston’s reconceptualisation of Thompsonian ideas within the history of science and c. reconstructing quotidian scientific practices from archival sources.

Long Abstract

My talk is divided into three parts. The first and introductory bit is devoted to the recent origins of approaching the past with an ethnological sensibility in British Marxist historiography, i. e. the work of E. P. Thompson during the 1960s and 1970s. The second part deals with Lorraine Daston's reconceptualisation of key Thompsonian ideas within the history of science since the early 1990s while the third and largest section focuses on reconstructing quotidian scientific practices from archival sources - without falling prey to a highly simplified, "flat" description like most of Bruno Latour's historiographical writings - and raises some enduring questions about writing and teaching the history of science in an anthropological manner.

Symbiosis of past and present in the formation of ethnocultural competencies of managers and economists

Author: Sergey Rychkov (Kazan National Research Technological University)  email

Short Abstract

The report identifies the modules of marketing disciplines in which ethnocultural component of the study of consumer behavior. Three approaches are indicated in the application of the historic-cultural discourse in the teaching process, allowing to connect the past with the present and even the future.

Long Abstract

Federal state educational standards of bachelor and masters in "Management" and "Economics" contains a list of a number of common cultural and professional competencies needed for graduates of analytical and research activities. Analysis of consumers - the most important area of activity.

There is a clear dependence of consumer behavior in the market of food, clothing, shoes, insurance, health services and several other of ethnicity. This confirms that the general theoretical postulate according to which ethnic and cultural component of consumer behavior plays an important role in making purchasing decisions. Consequently, for the training of managers and economists need in the educational process to provide students with knowledge of ethno-cultural character. Specifically ethnocultural aspects of consumer behavior study in the teaching of subjects such sections "Marketing" as a "marketing environment", "Consumer Behavior," "Marketing Communications".

In the process of teaching bachelors and masters of marketing disciplines used historical and cultural discourse. The past connects to the present using the three approaches. First: the sources of the present - the past. Second, this does not appear once in all market areas, remnants of the past accompany the present. Third: accounting and the use of ethnic and cultural traditions, the analysis of the fluctuations, receptions - the key to business success in the present and the future.

The work was supported by the RHF, project № 12-01-00018.

This panel is closed to new paper proposals.