ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE AND THE DEPARTMENT OF AFRICA, OCEANIA AND THE AMERICAS OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM

Anthropology, Weather & Climate Change

(Film2)
Climate Change on Film
Location British Museum - BP Lecture Theatre
Date and Start Time 28 May, 2016 at 16:30
Sessions 1

Convenors

  • Elizabeth Ogilvie email
  • Janet Boston (Perspective Film Production) email

Mail All Convenors

Short Abstract

None provided.

Long Abstract

None provided.

This panel is closed to new paper proposals.

Papers

Protecting People and Planet

Author: Janet Boston (Perspective Film Production)  email

Short Abstract

A series of films premiered at the Paris Climate Change Conference produced by Perspective Film Production showing how indigenous peoples and local communities - all 2015 Equator Prize Winners - are fighting to save their lands, reduce poverty, protect some of the planet’s most precious species and combat climate change.

Long Abstract

Protecting Forests - Home to 1.6 billion people who depend on them for survival and a global asset in the fight against climate change this film shows how local communities are stewards of many of the last remaining forests and vital if greenhouse gas emission targets are to be achieved.

Combating Climate Change - Despite the vulnerability of indigenous peoples and local communities to climate change, they have generations of experience coping with environmental uncertainty, knowledge central to forging effective climate change solutions. This film follows these solutions.

Securing Land Rights - Customary rights to over 65% of the world’s land area is held by indigenous people and local communities. Just 18% of that area is protected by government-recognized rights. As these films reveal, securing rights often demands decades of perseverance, partnership and fighting powerful vested interests. Films cover Belize, Bolivia, Honduras, Borneo, Madagascar.

Out of Ice

Author: Elizabeth Ogilvie  email

Short Abstract

Out of Ice is an enquiry into ways of reading and understanding ice and its place in the living whole. Ogilvie probes the fertile territory between nature/technology/culture to explore our contemporary relationship with the environment, while seeking the inspiring vision of Tim Ingold and other critical thinkers. While studying details of water/ice in the environment, Ogilvie gradually builds up an intimacy with their character. It’s this intimacy of seeing that she aims to share with her audience. In this presentation Ogilvie seeks to illustrate that her empiricism can be experienced, understood and applied, in both artistic and scientific terms; that she can, working alongside those in other disciplines, develop a language with her physical materials, water/ice where the rational contends on equal terms with the intuitive, and as such, begins to make a contribution to our insight into our relationship with our environment.

Long Abstract

None provided.

This panel is closed to new paper proposals.