ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE AND THE DEPARTMENT OF AFRICA, OCEANIA AND THE AMERICAS OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM

Anthropology, Weather & Climate Change

(Plenary1)
Opening and Plenary
Location British Museum - BP Lecture Theatre
Date and Start Time 27 May, 2016 at 10:00
Sessions 1

Convenors

None listed.

Chair Prof Paul Sillitoe

Short Abstract

None provided.

Long Abstract

None provided.

This panel is closed to new paper proposals.

Papers

Welcome

Author: David Shankland (Royal Anthropological Institute)  email

Short Abstract

None provided.

Long Abstract

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Welcome from the RAI

Author: André Singer  email

Short Abstract

None provided.

Long Abstract

None provided.

Welcome from the British Museum

Author: Lissant Bolton (British Museum)  email

Short Abstract

None provided.

Long Abstract

None provided.

Opening Remarks

Author: John Gummer, Lord Deben (Chair of the UK Committee on Climate Change)  email

Short Abstract

None provided.

Long Abstract

None provided.

Climate change, societies and development: the potential for anthropological engagement

Author: Tomasz Chruszczow (UNFCCC)  email

Short Abstract

The shift in emphasis in Paris from the top-down architecture of Kyoto to a more inclusive, bottom-up “polycentric” approach creates new opportunities for anthropologists to engage with climate change policy making. One of the biggest challenges of planning and implementation of climate policies nationally, locally and internationally is how to best take into account diversity of cultures and diversity of knowledge, including the indigenous knowledge of many communities worldwide, so as whatever action is taken (including investments in climate resilience) it will not result in irreversible impacts on such communities. In addition to issues related to indigenous peoples, there will be an expanded role for cities and non-governmental actors in climate policy. In developing diverse response strategies for both mitigation and adaptation, an anthropological understanding of local, political, scientific, and institutional cultures will be important in shaping the policy discourses around science and action that will be essential if the world is to achieve success in pursuit of the Paris goals. A number of institutions and programmes exist under the UNFCCC and new ones have been established by the Paris Agreement. Various dialogues and fora provide for a space to accommodate anthropologists’ participation. Their engagement in the current projects of the Adaptation and Technology Committees, in developing multiannual programme for the response measures forum or in designing the newly established institutions like Paris Committee for Capacity Building will be invaluable. Private sector investments could also be boosted thanks to better understanding of traditions and cultural background in the given area.

Long Abstract

None provided.

Anthropology and the Trouble of Risk Society

Author: Myanna Lahsen (Brazilian National Institute of Space Research (INPE))  email

Short Abstract

Twenty-two years ago, the late ecological anthropologist Roy Rappaport called for an “anthropology of trouble,” by which he meant an engaged, action-oriented anthropology focused on complex, contemporary societal problems and structural disorders. His proposal seems as relevant and important today, as epitomized by the mounting threats of climate change and resource depletion driven by contemporary production and consumption patterns. The threats are overwhelming in their scope, pace and complexity, and societal responses remain insufficient despite decades of scientific forecasts. This suggests the need to rethink assumptions about the science-policy interface along with research agendas and related institutions. After two decades as an anthropologist in global environmental change research institutions, I reflect on what this means for anthropology. I suggest that the environmental social sciences and humanities are equipped to provide vitally needed contributions towards transformations to sustainability, but that achieving this potential requires overcoming obstacles both external and internal to our community.

Long Abstract

None provided.

This panel is closed to new paper proposals.