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IUAES 2013: Evolving Humanity, Emerging Worlds. 5-10 August 2013.

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Evolving humanity, emerging worlds

Manchester, UK; 5th-10th August 2013

(LD23)

Tribal health: emerging consequences in the era of globalization

Location University Place 3.214
Date and Start Time 07 Aug, 2013 at 09:00

Convenor

Pinak Tarafdar (University of North Bengal) email
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Short Abstract

Concept of health among the tribes is more conspicuously differ from one to another culture. Culturally explainable phenomena on tribal health altered both in affirmative and negative dimension in the era of globalization as it is effectively introduced the new traits and technological innovations.

Long Abstract

The concept of health is one of the significant cognitive understandings of any of the tribal population in the universe. The more accentuated on culturally explainable phenomena on health conspicuously differ from one tribal culture to another. Inevitably the health issues and health seeking behaviour among them are being utilized as the generation wise transmitted affairs. Existence of an entire tribal population is well protected through their age old healthcare practices but it might be effective enough if it is exercised in the confinement of their own territory along with a less communication with other cultures. The roles of the tribal healers are to be mentionable in this regard. They are the main impetus for growing up the confidence and psychological assurance among the patients as both of them share the identical cultural milieu. Therefore the matter of tribal health emphatically intermingled with the culture and its exclusiveness.

The upcoming era of globalization is actually responsible for effective interaction of different cultures which is also emerges as the introduction of new innovative so called modern technologies. The overall medical system is also under the engulfed of the said process. As a result both positive and negative consequences are found to be incepted among the tribal culture which also certainly alters the usual health seeking behaviour of them. Introduction of health related cultural traits are the instances of the former and intervention of the so called modern medical system seems to be the later.

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Papers

Changes in Religion and Its Impact on Health of Tamangs of Sikkim, India

Authors: Yougan Tamang (University of North Bengal)  email
Pinak Tarafdar (University of North Bengal)  email
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Short Abstract

Religion is a nucleus of every culture and collection of behavior. Migration among the largest Tibeto-Burman ethnic group of Sikkim ‘Tamang’ has witnessed the change in their religion to different forms that altered their health seeking behaviour and medical system considerably.

Long Abstract

Health is a pre-requisite for human development and it also has specific functions, which is intimately related to its value system, philosophical and cultural traditions. The culture of a community determines the health behaviour of the community. The cultural pattern varies from tribe to tribe and region to region which hold distinctiveness in the system of beliefs, values, tradition and ultimately religion. Religion is a product of culture and essential part of social machinery which exercises profound influences over man in all socio-cultural aspects. Change in culture brings about change in religious behaviour which influences the health seeking behaviours and medical systems of any community or tribe. Thus the largest Tibeto-Burman ethnic group of Sikkim 'Tamang' have experienced huge migration from Tibet through Nepal to Sikkim leading to changes in culture and religion that ultimately created a new dimension of medical system, health seeking behaviour, the concept of health. 'Tamang' have witnessed acculturation at different phases of migration which has characterized them with the uniqueness of amalgamation of three forms of religion i.e. animism, polytheism and monotheism which has profoundly influenced their health seeking behavior at the present day in Sikkim.

This paper would basically highlight how 'Tamang' have witnessed changes in culture which eventually led to changes and amalgamation of religion and the influence on the indigenous health care system among the 'Tamang' and also provide an extensive understanding of various distinctive health practices among them.

An appraisal of HIV/AIDS related knowledge among the Bharia of Central India

Authors: Dipak Adak (Anthropological Survey of India)  email
Tiluttoma Baruah (Cotton College, Assam)  email
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Short Abstract

The Bharia, a primitive tribe of Central India is discussed in terms of HIV/AIDS knowledge. Study reveals a very low level of awareness on HIV/AIDS among them.

Long Abstract

Health problems of the primitive tribes are as varied as the primitive tribal groups themselves, who present a bewildering variety in their socio-economic, socio-cultural and ecological settings. Their knowledge system (beliefs, customs, rituals, tradition, and values) is closely associated with their health culture. Misery of the study population, Bharia primitive tribal group of Dindori district, Madhya Pradesh is compounded by poverty, ignorance, illiteracy, hostile environment, poor sanitation, lack of safe drinking water and faith in traditional beliefs. The study reveals that perception regarding HIV/AIDS is very poor among the Bharia. For a better situation health education needs to be imparted by the local Bharia people.

Factors affecting infant and child mortality among two tribes of Arunachal Pradesh, India

Author: Tiluttoma Baruah (Cotton College, Assam)  email
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Short Abstract

The Miju and Khampti of Arunachal Pradesh are discussed in terms of infant and child mortality and associated factors.

Long Abstract

Apart from their use as demographic measure, the levels of infant and child mortality are important as the indicators of health and general standard of living of a community. For effective planning and implementation of many developmental programs in any country the knowledge of infant and child mortality among different cultural groups and their determinants is essential. The present study was carried out among two mongoloid populations namely, the Miju and Khampti of Arunachal Pradesh. The two populations differ from one another in culture and occupation. The Miju show considerably higher percentage of deaths before the age of 1 year and within 1-4 years. The study reveals that sense of health consciousness is considerably better in the Khampti than the Miju.

The Impact of Globalization on the Tribal Girls' Construction of Puberty and Health

Author: Sampa Taraphdar (Basu) (Govt. of West Bengal)  email
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Short Abstract

In this post modern, global moment, the study would try to asses the impact of new cognition of coming of age among the tribal girls under the pressure of globalization in respect of their health.

Long Abstract

Globalization and the entrenchment of corporate power seems to be an unprecedented opportunity to the indigenous or tribal communities for empowerment as it has made it easier for them to organize, raise funds, and raise awareness for human right abuses and network with other groups around the world. But in reality, as a marginalized group, tribal people have been experiencing it rather as an unprecedented threat by unfavorable exclusion from decision making, commoditization of their culture and unfavorable inclusion in the so called developmental project of the multinationals.

In this era of globalization indigenous concept of health which extends beyond the physical well being of an individual to the spiritual balance and well being of the community as a whole has also been ignored by the global health programmes, plans, projects and policies including initiatives to achieve the Millennium Development Goals. The newer focus on 'Reproductive Child Health' has highlighted that if the health of woman is to be improved; the health of the adolescents must be given high priority. In this context, the present study would like to find out how the indigenous belief, rituals and practices melt with the modern knowledge and ideologies under the pressure of globalization to forge a new cognition of coming of age among the tribal girls. Moreover, the study would also try to asses the impact of this new knowledge of puberty of the tribal girls in respect of their health.

Health and Globalisation: A Study among the Drukpas of Buxa Duar Region, West Bengal, India

Authors: Subhankar Roy (University of North Bengal)  email
Pinak Tarafdar (University of North Bengal)  email
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Short Abstract

Tribal health care practices are transforming towards modernity due to the wave of globalisation. Present paper will reveal the various impacts of globalisation on the health seeking behaviour among the Drukpas of Buxa-Duar region, West Bengal, India.

Long Abstract

Globalisation is a process which operates across the boundaries of nations, cultures, and societies privileging a pace towards larger integration of the world eventually facilitating an interdependent movement towards the global culture. Globalisation in the context of health may be viewed as a concerted global effort towards prevention, elimination and eradication of various ailments. Further, globalisation also worldwide primarily promotes the so called modern health seeking behaviour. But in the tribal situation health is closely related with their culture, environment and social structure. Most of the tribal communities define health, medical care and etiology of disease in relation to their socio-cultural phenomena. The overall survival and health security of the tribe was strongly depended on their traditional health seeking behaviour which is hastily replaced by the modern health care practices due to the effect of globalisation and cultural transformation.

Indigenous tribe like Drukpa, inhabiting in the Buxa-Duar region of Indo-Bhutan border are well adapted in value to their environment. But in the era of globalisation the indigenous health care practices of the Drukpas are transforming towards so called modernity due to the wave of non-traditional elements entering into their social and cultural life. It seriously affects their dependable traditional health seeking behaviour. The Drukpas tend to be taking a turn towards modern system of medicine though still they have some faith in their age-old medical system.

Changes in the Oraon Traditional Medicine: An effect of Globalization

Author: Saonli Roy (University of North Bengal)  email
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Short Abstract

Tribal health is very much influenced by globalization; due to various policies the people were not able to access the forest so they have to mould themselves towards the modern medical practices.

Long Abstract

Health is no doubt a major concern of community development. The health problems need special attention in the context of tribal communities of India. The World health Organization has defined health as a state of complete physical, mental and social well being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. Oraon is one of the tribal communities found in India, which mainly depends on agriculture for their economic development. Sometimes they also depend upon the forest also. They have the knowledge of treatment of diseases invariably based on the use of medicinal herbs found in the region. They used leaves, roots, bark of trees and some plants which grow in the jungle.

The tribal's in India have met different facts regarding their relationship with forest. The forest occupies a central position in tribal culture and economy. The tribal way of life is very much dictated by the forest right from birth to death. It is ironical that the poorest people of India are living in the areas of richest natural resources. This was happened mainly because of the administrative impositions and changes in the forest policies. For the effect of modern trends they were bound to convert themselves. For various rules of forest the tribal groups don't able to collect the herbs. There are some restrictions to cut the trees so they have to opt modern health care practices.

Indigenous knowledge of the other people: A humanitarian approach

Author: Ashok Das Gupta (University of North Bengal )  email
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Short Abstract

In this paper, the author investigates that whether indigenous knowledge has anything to do with sustainable development. Case studies are taken from India.

Long Abstract

India is a developing country and characterized by multiculturalism. A culture like a book holds certain politico-religious organizations and socio-economic institutions. The social systems beyond the western influence or having own features are traditional. Their Indigenous Knowledge system holistically is too useful for certain Public Service that could not ever be imagined. Here, in this paper, certain case studies are dealt with that are appearing to resolve, national and global problems. Could we imagine?

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Globalisation and its impacts among the Drukpas: problems and perspectives

Authors: Dip Pandey (University of North Bengal)  email
Pinak Tarafdar (University of North Bengal)  email
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Short Abstract

Changes are the dynamic aspect of nature and it runs through the procession of time. It also accelerates the lifestyle of a group. The present paper will reveal the social and cultural changes among the Drukpas due to the impact of the modern era of globalization.

Long Abstract

Change is a law of nature. The society is an ever-changing phenomenon, accommodating itself to changing conditions and sometimes sufferings vast modifications in the course of time. Social cultural change means the evolution and transformation of society as a whole. For many indigenous groups, the advent of globalization threatens the sustainability of their culture. Most of the societies in the world are in the fast process of change.

In this context, discussions have been taken place about the Drukpa tribal group, situated in the Buxa-Duar region, Jalpaiguri district, West Bengal. They are passing through the remarkable transitional phases from their social as-well-as cultural life, socio-economic condition and of course the religious attributes. Modern forces have been actively molding their life. Although the entire Buxa-Duar region was inhabited by the Drukpas but the present study was conducted in the village Chunabhati. Changes occurred in the every sphere of life where as the religious conversion into Christianity played a significant role. Overall, this tribal group is some how faced a jolt of globalization in various sphere of their livelihood.

The menopausal syndrome - An issue unaddressed in India

Author: Uma Chatterjee Saha (Xavier Institute of Management Jabalpur)  email
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Short Abstract

The study identifies major challenges in the provision of RCH services to the women beyond 40 years of age, who need both maternity and menopausal related services.

Long Abstract

Older women in India are a medically marginalized group, as there was thinking in the past that they are not linked with family welfare programme in any ways. But it is predicted that by 2025, approximately 165 million Indians, i.e, more than 12 percent of the country's population will be 60 years or above in age. The figure represents a 167 percent increase over the corresponding figure for 1996. The average life expectancy in India was 31 years according to the Census conducted four years after Independence, increased to 71 years in 2001. However, the achievements made in terms of longevity stand diminished owing to the lack of specialized health care that addresses the medical needs of the aged.

Menopause is accompanied by different types of emotional and physical changes like irregular menstruation, excessive bloodshed, abdominal cramps, prolapses,breast-cancer, osteoporosis, Urinary Tract Infection etc. The percentages of women suffering from these diseases are high in India (NFHS 2& 3). Besides the elderly women also have psychological problems like depression, isolation, loneliness and irritation etc. Looking into the gravity of the problems the present paper tries to analyze the gynecological, social and psychological issues related to the health of middle aged women. The study identifies major challenges in the provision of RCH services to the women beyond 40 years of age, who need both maternity and menopausal related services simultaneously as many women in their 40s reach menopause and many other continue to bear children.

Play and games in tribes of West Bengal with special emphasis on health and fitness: an applied anthropological focus

Author: Abhijit Das (West Bengal State University)  email
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Short Abstract

The games are integral aspect of tribal culture of West Bengal.The texts vary according to their ecology and techno-economic levels.The games of physical skill require sound health and fitness of the players.The study shows the conservation of these games from applied anthropolological perspective.

Long Abstract

Play and games represent one of the variegated patterns of recreation, as cultural universal. The pattern of games and allied plansideredyful activities may be broadly categorized as games of physical skill, strategy, and chance and also may be played by individual and group or team.

The , traditional folk games are existing in many pre-industrial societies like tribal communities in West Bengal, the texts and contexts of which are integral part of their techno-economic levels and ecological settings. Most of the play and games are characterized by spontaneity, exuberance, and gaiety. Some games or playful events require sound health along with physical and mental fitness, motor skill, endurance, strategy without any direction, guidance and control of recreation leaders and trainers. The patterns consist of physical prowess as well as motor fitness , are found to be played among the tribal boys and youths mostly prefer to play spontaneous play and games of strategy and chance which also depict running, jumping, breathing, vertical stance, balancing the body, and many other play elements which require physical fitness of the players with cognitive aptitudes.

The present study highlights the ethnography of play and games of tribal communities of West Bengal on the basis of their ecological settings and levels of techno-economy. It also aims to show the interpretation of applied anthropological relevance and pertinence of conserving these folk games in their own age-old contexts. Finally, the suggestive measures may help the planners and policy makers for conservation of folk cultural elements under globalization.

A comparative study of the impact of occupational hazards on the health of brass working communities in Orissa, Eastern India

Author: Debasis Kumar Mondal (West Bengal State University)  email
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Short Abstract

The paper mainly focus on the comparative study of occupational health hazards among two brass working communities, one practice indigenous method of metal casting and another practice beating process in Orissa, India.

Long Abstract

Brass metal work is one of the oldest cottage industries in India. The age old craft is practiced throughout the country. Present focus is given on two brass working communities, one in Khurda district and other in Dhenkanal district of Orissa. The 'Ghantara' community of Dhenkanal district practice the lost wax process of casting and the 'kansari' community of Khurda district practice beating process. These two types of work are practiced in two different geophysical setting and different working environment. Both males and females practice lost wax process whereas beating process is mainly done by male members of the artisan's family. It also identified the various hazards brought about by their nature of work, and the surrounding environment. The main symptoms are found in beating process are Musculoskeletal diseases, Neurological diseases, Respiratory diseases, Skin diseases, the digestive system (ingestion); infection in the respiratory tract (inhalation); hand or wrist tenosynovitis (inflammation in tendons), hearing loss, lateral epicondylitis ('tennis elbow'), contact dermatitis (skin inflammation), carpal tunnel syndrome (nerve compression in the wrist), Raynaud's syndrome ('vibration white finger'), mesothelioma (cancer), and asthma. These symptoms are rare in case of the artisans who practised lost wax process of brass work. The present paper mainly highlights how the modern technology increases the risk factors of different diseases in comparison to the indigenous technology.

Social and Cultural Dimensions of Health of Tribal Tea Plantation Workers of North Bengal in India - Some Observations

Author: Sekh Rahim Mondal (North Bengal University)  email
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Short Abstract

This paper is an attempt to examine the cultural dimensions and health behaviour of Tribal Tea Plantations workers of Sub-Himalayan North Bengal in India.

Long Abstract

The study of health, health behaviour and health culture are the most important fields of Anthropological research. But the studies of health of Tribal Tea plantation workers are rather very scanty, particularly in the context of interface and interaction between traditional and modern health care practices.

This paper is an attempt to examine the cultural dimensions and health behaviour of Tribal Tea Plantations workers of Sub-Himalayan North Bengal in India. Special emphasis shall be given in this paper to highlight the changes in health behaviour of tribal workers under plantation social system.

The author is of opinion that the tribal workers in tea plantation have still retained much of their traditional health care practices, but at the same time they are also participating in modern health care system. Availability of modern medical facilities, economic costs involved on them, educational status of the people and above all their tradition have a great role in determining the health behaviour and health culture of the tribal people.

Religion and its impact on Health among the Totos

Authors: Rimi Dutta (University of North Bengal)  email
Pinak Tarafdar (University of North Bengal)  email
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Short Abstract

Impact of religion and influences of acculturated traits among the various small tribes led to changes in the traditional health care practices and health seeking behavior.

Long Abstract

"Health is of universal interest and concern" (Forest Clemens). Human being irrespective of culture, class or historical epoch experiences sickness and death. Every community has a set of ideas as part of their culture for defining health, disease, etiological theories and therapeutic techniques for easing pain and for making statements about probable outcome of disease. On the other hand, religion is the product of culture and plays an important role of functioning social institutions. Cultural practices often shape the religious behavior of a community which eventually influences the health behavior and healing mechanism of any population. The smallest mongoloid tribe of North Bengal has witnessed metastasis of various cultural traits of different populations. This has led to changes in religious behavior of the concern population which ultimately reflected in their medical system, healing procedure and their concept of health and well-being.

This paper would basically highlight how does acculturation of various cultural traits led to change in religious behavior of any community which ultimately influences the health seeking behavior of the concern people. This also provides an exclusive understanding of health and healing care practices of the Toto population.

Tribal Medicine and Health Practices in the Era of Globalization: Problems and Prospects in Indian Context.

Author: Arpita Ghosh (Rabindra Bharati University )  email
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Short Abstract

Indigenous Knowledge is the knowledge that has been developed over time in a community mainly through accumulation of experiences and intimate understanding of the environment in a given culture.Traditional knowledge systems in medicine and health have been time tested over generations. Traditional and tribal knowledge systems in health cover a wide range from disease prevention, health promotion and healing which are essentially non-western in nature.

Long Abstract

The indigenous knowledge base of a particular social entity includes such categories as agricultural knowledge, medicinal knowledge, biodiversity-related knowledge, and expressions of folklore in the form of music, dance, song, handicraft, designs, stories and artwork. Indigenous knowledge has recently been regarded as an important commodity in global health development but unfortunately, over the years this traditional and indigenous practices were ignored.

In several parts of Asia and in many areas all over the world today such traditional knowledge are still widely used which have been passed from one generation to another mainly by oral and lifestyle practices mode and are well codified and protected for generations. Traditional knowledge systems in medicine and health have been time tested over generations. Traditional and tribal knowledge systems in health cover a wide range from disease prevention, health promotion and healing which are essentially non-western in nature.

But following the 1991economic reforms, the Indian healthcare system is undergoing major changes. With the advent of globalization the tribals have been further marginalized in the name of development which have left adverse imprints in the traditional ways of life of the tribal communities. The traditional medicine and health practices of the tribal communities are facing high degree of threats from modern medicine. The native healer traditions which are precious remains uncared for and are fast disappearing.

The present paper deals with such aspects of globalization that has led to the disappearance of such traditions and looms large which still dimly exist.

Tribal health: Issue of health care practices among the Primitive Tribal Group (PTG) Hill Kharia, District Purulia, West Bengal, India

Author: Suvendu Kundu (North Bengal University)  email
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Short Abstract

Concept of health and treatment process among the PTG (Hill Kharia) is depends on their indigenous knowledge with correspondence to the ecological niche. The primary health care infrastructure provides the first level contact between the population and health care providers and forms the common pathway for implementation of all health related service.

Long Abstract

Tribal communities are mostly forest dwellers. Their health status and medical knowledge are ages, known as "Traditional Health Care system" depends on the herbal and psychosomatic lines of treatment. Faith healing has always been a part of traditional health care practices in the tribal health care system. The common belief, customs, tradition, values and practices connected with health and disease have been closely associated with the treatment of diseases.

Despite remarkable progress in the field of diagnostics and curative and preventive health, still primitive Tribal Group (PTG) Hill Kharia are living in isolation in natural and unpolluted surroundings far away from civilization with their traditional values, customs, beliefs and myth intact and besides unaffected by the developmental process going in the developing country like India.

The health problems of Hill Kharias are influenced by various factors like social, economical and ecological circumstance. However very interesting fact that the ecological variations also play very important role in the context of health and treatment process that is very much explainable in the two Hill Kharia villages under this study.

The widespread poverty, illiteracy, malnutrition, absence of safe drinking water, poor maternal and child health service and insufficient service of national health service contributing factors to dismal health condition prevailing among the PTG Hill Kharia of Purulia, West Bengal, India.

Indigenous knowledge of Tribal Medicinal practices in Central India : an Anthropo-Pharmaceutical approach

Authors: Somnath Chakraverty (B. E. C., University of Calcutta)  email
Raja Chakraverty (Gupta College Of Technological Sciences,asansol)  email
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Short Abstract

The indigenous collective knowledge on community health and ethno-medicinal practices have evolved and refined through trial and error method spontaneously experienced for generations as also shared within a community. The uncertainty in curing diseases has traditionally integrated the essential elements of science with supernatural beliefs, interpretations and performances.

Long Abstract

In this multidisciplinary model of approach, the traditional health practices and ethno-medicinal system accessible in a particular locality, rather within a distinct topo cultural area is explored for understanding varied facts of common ethno-medicinal practices. The study includes the system of transmission of the indigenous knowledge in synchronic and diachronic dimensions, on potential resources and its process of mobilization.

Behavioural dimensions of reproductive health among the Sahariya Tribal Youths of Gwalior District of Madhya Pradesh

Author: Kalyan B. Saha (Indian Council of Medical Research)  email
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Short Abstract

The study will highlight the social risk factors along with knowledge, attitude, behaviour and practice about reproductive and sexual matters among the Sahariay tribal youth and identify the constrains in effective intervention and utilization of health services for prevention and management of reproductive morbidity.

Long Abstract

Today, in the context of reproductive health problems the focus of intervention is gradually indicating the importance of the section of population called ''Youths". In India National Family Health Survey-3(2005-06) reports high risk sex behavior among the youths. Further, the situation is more critical among tribal youths. The present study on Sahariya youths endeavours to understand the social risk factors along with knowledge, attitude, behaviour and practice about reproductive and sexual matters among the tribal youth and identify the constrains in effective intervention and utilization of health services for prevention and management of reproductive morbidity. 702 Sahariya youth in the age group 15-24 years were interviewed. The participatory rural appraisal (PRA) techniques were also applied.

Sahariya tribe is susceptible to social and behavioural risk factors in terms of sexuality, connectedness, their meeting pattern, domestic violence, etc. Nearly half of them had wrong perception on different aspects of pregnancy. HIV/AIDS and other STI were heard by 45% and 25% of the respondents respectively with many misconceptions about its routs of transmission. Seventeen percent of the respondents aware of STI reported self suffering and symptoms during reference period. The constrains in effective intervention and utilization of services for prevention and management of reproductive morbidity is ignorance and misconception on the sexual and reproductive health issues among the tribe. The study reveals that there is a imperative need to improve demand for services among the youths with education on reproductive morbidity and safe sexual life.

Health practices among the Santal women: A study in India and Bangladesh

Author: Suchismita Sen Chowdhury (Rajdanga Pragati Society (NGO))  email
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Short Abstract

Health care practices among Santals are surrounded by the traditional beliefs. The Santals of India and Bangladesh both are influenced by the existing health policies and social system. Being an important part of the society, health care system adopted by the women becomes a global issue.

Long Abstract

In the tribal societies 'health' is not only a physical state of an individual, rather it is influenced by socio-cultural and economic factors. While modern health care system is highly complex, many tribal societies sill live on traditional health practices. Health care practices not only involve utilization of available facilities, but also belief system of a society. Apart from utilization of available facilities, health care system of a community involves traditional knowledge on the natural medicine and preventive care. At present, indigenous knowledge on the disease and treatment has become a matter of concern in the global health care scenario. The women health in any society is a matter of concern as their health directly influence children health. But in many cases women health remains unnoticed by the family. The Santals traditionally believed that diseases are generally unnatural and are caused by some supernatural forces. They strongly believed on the traditional medicine and medicine man. Women are important part of the Santal society. The women health in Santal society is surrounded by beliefs and traditional practices. The Santals were originally the inhabitants of eastern part of India. With time they have migrated to Bangladesh. Now they are living in these two countries having different socio-political set ups. The facilities available in these countries are different. The traditional health practices of the Santals might have undergone changes. The different situations influenced the health care practices of the Santal women living in India and Bangladesh has been examined in this paper.

Ethnomedical Practices among the Siddi of Coastal North Karnataka

Author: Rajesh Kundargi (Pondicherry Central University)  email
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Short Abstract

researcher brings out the interactionist elements that exist within a nuanced cultural context, when we take into account the health seeking behavior of the people Siddi. It is the institution of ganwati dawa which forms the basis of the ethnomedical practices of the Siddi tribe

Long Abstract

with the advent of modernity, in the form of increased mobility among the people ,shifting occupational patterns, changing family structure, modern healthcare and educational facilities, the people are encountering new and impending realities within the domain of health and illness. Thus, the present paper makes use of the framework of quality of care in unraveling the discourse between the indigenous ethnomedical practices on one side, and the forces of medicalization as an agenda of modernity on the other.

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