P026
Governing urban commons

Convenors:
Goran Janev (Sts Cyril and Methodius University Skopje)
Fabio Mattioli (John Jay College of Criminal Justice)
Location:
A-402
Start time:
1 August, 2014 at 9:00
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This panel embraces both theoretical and ethnographic papers that engage with the notions of right to the city and similar politically articulated demands for change of the regulation of urban commons and related democratic citizenship entitlements and to alternative practices that points the way.

Long abstract:

The latest wave of protests around the globe has one thing in common - they are urban phenomenon first and foremost. Lefebvre's urban society theory gains traction with each new Tahrir or Puerta del Sol square occupation, with each new Zuccoti or Gezi Park protest. Disappearance of the city and the rise of the urban society are evident with each new urban revolution and the question arises as to what these will lead? Each new protest challenges our economic and political system and questions its capacity to create sustainable communities. The redefinition of our entitlements to urban commons is key for this change. Bringing together, within thus framed analytical scope, the notions of public space and public sphere points towards imminent redefinition of the basic categories of citizenship, democracy and political governance. We also must remain open for noting the spatial practices that reveal the emerging pockets of resistance. It becomes apparent that neoliberal logic of privatized or state appropriated public space is the main obstacle for successful culmination of citizens' occupations. While our main focus will be on the public space and the sites of resistance we would embrace papers that look at infrastructural, housing and otherwise related demands and alternative practices that challenge the existing regulation of urban commons. This panel seeks for both theoretical and ethnographic papers that engage with the notions of right to the city and similar politically articulated demands for change of the regulation of urban commons and related democratic citizenship entitlements and to alternative practices that points the way.