P34
Race, ethnicity and racism in Latin America: exploring the uncomfortable linkages

Convenors:
Desiree Poets
Monica Moreno Figueroa (University of Cambridge)
Peter Wade (Manchester University)
Location:
Malet 354
Start time:
4 April, 2014 at 11:30
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This panel aims to present research on race, ethnicity, racism and anti-racism in Latin America. The purpose is to explore and facilitate a constructive dialogue on ethnic and/or racial relations, specifically addressing the intersections between the different ethnic/racial groups in the region.

Long abstract:

This panel aims to present research on the topics of race, ethnicity, racism and anti-racism in Latin America. The purpose is to explore and facilitate a constructive dialogue on ethnic and/or racial relations, specifically addressing the intersections between indigenous, afro-descendants, mestizo, white and other migrant populations in the region. Such intersections are usually challenging research paradigms on the study of race and ethnicity where the emphasis is to favour one group's experience. This approach highlights then 'uncomfortable' linkages, between different themes, populations and theoretical frameworks in order to counter established imaginings of race/ethnicity and practices of racism at a transnational level. This can be done, for instance, through examinations of Afro-Indigenous spaces and relations, their solidarities in their struggles for the recognition of their rights, lands and even existence, as well as the common differences these groups share and around which they for instance build their strategies of resistance. Such explorations break down the stereotyped images of blackness and indigeneity, and explore anti-racist strategies developed by those groups. Another approach could be through explorations of white privilege in specific communities or countries throughout a variety of racialised and/or ethnic groups. We invite papers that are open to engage with such topics and linkages, fostering a critical perspective on the experiences of subalternity and alterity and on the prevailing classifications of human beings into groups for the purposes of control mechanisms. Anti-racist thought, practices and strategies are herewith furthered and consolidated.