P15
Gender and extractive industries in Latin America

Convenors:
Katy Jenkins (Northumbria University)
Location:
Malet 353
Start time:
4 April, 2014 at 14:15
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel explores how gender intersects with the expansion of extractive industries in Latin America. Papers aim to make visible women's experiences, and focus on how gender roles, gender relations, and gendered spaces and subjectivities shape, and are shaped by, extractive industries.

Long abstract:

This panel aims to critically explore how gender intersects with diverse issues related to the expansion of extractive industries in Latin America. Whilst, as Bebbington observes, "…the rise of extractive industry visits tremendous change and dislocation on territories and countries within which it occurs […] [and is associated with] unprecedented transformations of landscape, labour and social relations" (Bebbington 2012: 5), the experiences of women in relation to this unfolding scenario remain largely invisible, with little critical analysis of the ways in which gender roles, gender relations, and gendered spaces and subjectivities shape, and are shaped by, this complex set of processes. The extractive industries have, in a variety of contexts, been shown not to be gender neutral, but to impact disproportionately on women, particularly poor and rural women (e.g. Oxfam Australia 2009, Ahmad & Lahiri-Dutt 2006, Macdonald & Rowland 2002). However, literature engaging with these issues deals principally with the context of Australasia and Asia and, with a couple of exceptions (Rondón 2009, Li 2009), there has been little empirical focus on the Latin American context, despite the rapid expansion of extractive activities in the region. Papers are therefore invited on topics including, but not limited to, the gendered impacts of extractive industries on communities and individuals; women as workers, particularly in relation to artisanal and informal mining; gendered violence and exploitation in affected communities; women as anti-mining activists; the intersections of gender and indigeneity in relation to extractive industries; and women's human rights and the extractives sector.