Accepted paper:

Living with birds of prey: more-than-human architectures and the domus

Author:

Sara Asu Schroer (University of Oslo)

Paper short abstract:

Building on ethnographic examples from falconry and raptor conservation this paper argues for a more-than-human perspective when considering architectures and material infrastructures in contexts of domestication.

Paper long abstract:

Building on ethnographic examples from falconry and raptor conservation this paper argues for a more-than-human perspective when considering architectures and material infrastructures in contexts of domestication. It is suggested that such 'architectures of domestication' (Anderson et al.: forthcoming) are best understood through an ecological approach that focuses on the co-creative activities and practices in which humans and nonhuman beings are involved. Such an emplacement is not to be understood through a pure focus on human domination or multi-species mutualism but rather as enrolling relations of control with those of care and comfort. Material infrastructures (e.g. aviaries, hack towers, hoods and tethers) in falconry and raptor conservation will serve as ethnographic examples of the more-than-human knowledge practices that go into their design and use. The paper will thus contribute to the so far little explored material inventories of domestication through understanding architectural structures as central for the establishment of cross-species communication and co-living. References: Anderson, D., Loovers P., Schroer S. and R. Wishart (forthcoming). 'Architectures of Domestication: On Emplacing Human-Animal relationships in the North'. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute.

panel Mat04
Shared spaces: perspectives on animal architecture