P204
Ritual places through the ritual year I

Convenors:
Irina Sedakova (Institute of Slavic Studies, Moscow)
Laurent Fournier (University of Aix-Marseille)
Location:
Block 1, Piso 0, Room 36
Start time:
19 April, 2011 at 11:30
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This panel would like to question the ways in which individual life-cycle or collective rituals and calendric festivals contribute to the emotional making of places. Case studies concerning different ritual shapes and places are welcome, together with more theoretical or methodological presentations.

Long abstract:

Since 2004, yearly conferences in the SIEF Ritual Year Working Group have focused on issues such as rituals in general, ritual diversity, the ritual year and history, gender in rituals, masking and mumming, and ritual performances. However, no special attention has yet been devoted to the spatial shapes of rituals or to the places where they are performed. This panel would like to question the ways in which individual life-cycle or collective rituals and calendric festivals contribute to the emotional making of places. How do the spatial shapes of rituals contribute to reinforcing their emotional meaning in the eyes of the people performing them? Are there any differences between religious and secular rituals regarding their relations to space? What changes can be observed regarding ritual places when comparing the pre-modern, modern and post-modern eras? Why and how does a specific ritual correlate or not with a specific place? In short, what part do rituals and their values play in the making of places? Case studies concerning different ritual shapes and places are welcome, together with more theoretical or methodological presentations. First, contributors can describe the different ways of using places in rituals such as processions, ritual perambulations or circumambulations, dual or multiple oppositions, ritual scrums, ritual crowd gatherings, etc. Second, they are encouraged to report on the ways in which the accepted knowledge in folklore and/or anthropology has dealt with these data in the past. Third, they are invited to propose new tools and theoretical models to address the ritual making of places.