Accepted paper:

Flexible and multilayered 'indigeneity': as an introduction to panel 077

Authors:

Naoko Fukayama (Tokyo Keizai University)

Paper short abstract:

In New Zealand, it is common for Māori to claim the colonial injustices in units of tribal groups. Here 'indigeneity' based on locality is emphasized. However, when they deal with the issues that cannot be localized, 'indigeneity' as pan-Māori becomes mobilized. 'Indigeneity' is flexible and multilayered.

Paper long abstract:

In Aotearoa New Zealand, Māori gained the solid status as the 'indigenous people' in 1970s supported by legal recognition of the Treaty of Waitangi. Since 1980s, it has become common for Māori to claim the (post-)colonial injustices including confiscations of the lands in judicial or political arena in units of tribal groups. The so-called retribalization has occurred, and 'indigeneity' based on locality tends to be emphasized. On the other hand, when they need to deal with the issues that cannot be divided or localized, 'indigeneity' as pan-Māori becomes mobilized. It could be observed in cases of the issues regarding to fishing rights or ownership of foreshore and seabed. Therefore at least in Māori case, 'indigeneity' can be understood to be flexible and multilayered.

panel P077
On being "indigenous peoples": connecting local practices with global context