Accepted paper:

Creating the local: the case of Goan theatre, tiatr

Authors:

Kyoko Matsukawa (Konan University)

Paper short abstract:

This paper tries to examine how local identity is created through theatre performance and networking of performers, by taking the case of Goan tiatr. By analyzing the history and the present situation of Goan Catholic migration, this paper tries to show how tiatr connects Goans with home.

Paper long abstract:

This paper attempts to examine how local identity is created through the theatre performance and networking of performers, by taking the case of Goan tiatr. The Portuguese ruled Goa between 1510 and 1961. One of the remaining legacies of the history is the strong presence of the Catholic community. In the 19th century, a number of Goan Catholics migrated to other Portuguese colonies (mainly Mozambique and Angola) as well as places under British rule (Bombay, Karachi, Kenya, and Tanzania etc.) to seek employment. Unlike Hindus, their adoption of western dress and food habits enabled them to work outside India. The history of Goan migration is reflected in the development of tiatr. Tiatr was first performed by a group of Catholic Goans in Bombay in 1892. It was an adaptation of Italian opera and performed in Konkani, Goan local language. Tiatr later evolved into a musical theatre with Konkani songs (kantars). Common themes of tiatr stories and kantars are Goan social problems. The centre of tiatr activities was Bombay and shifted to Goa later. Tiatrs are usually performed on the village feast days. Besides, many troupes stage their productions in city halls. Tiatrs are performed outside India, too. Bombay troupes used to visit Goan communities in East Africa. Today, Goan troupes travel mostly to the Gulf countries and London. Goan diasporas themselves perform tiatr, too. This paper analyzes how tiatr connects Goan migrants with home, based on the data which was collected in Goa, Mumbai, Dubai and Kuwait.

panel P005
The transformation of South Asian performing arts in the age of globalization: an anthropological analysis