P134
Anthropology of Japan in Korea / Anthropology of Korea in Japan (KOSCA/JASCA joint panel) (CLOSED)

Convenors:
Okpyo Moon (Academy of Korean Studies)
Junji Koizumi (NIHU and Osaka University)
Discussant:
Prof Mutsuhiko Shima (formerly Tohoku University) Prof Matsumoto Seiichi (Toyo University) Dr Ota Shimpei (National Museum of Ethnology, Osaka) Prof Byungho Chung (Hanyang University) Prof Seungmi Han (Yonsei University)
Location:
Convention Hall B
Start time:
17 May, 2014 at 8:30
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

A closed panel to review the works of Japanese anthropology on Korea and Korean anthropology on Japan in relation to colonial and postcolonial histories and their implications on anthropological practices in both countries

Long abstract:

Anthropologies in each country have unique trajectories that directly and indirectly reflect the relative position of the country in the world system of knowledge production. The fact seems to be particularly salient in the case of Japan and Korea, the two neighboring countries in East Asia that have shared long-term and changing historical relationships. Having been colonized by Japan for more than three decades at the beginning of the 20th century, Korea has largely remained an object of anthropological study. It is only into the 1980s, Korean anthropologists have been able to study Japan as an anthropological field. In this panel that is jointly organized by the KOSCA (Korean Society for Cultural Anthropology) and JASCA (Japanese Society for Cultural Anthropology), it is hoped 1) to reconsider the position of Korean and Japanese anthropologies in the context of anthropological knowledge production in the world and in East Asia in particular; and 2) to review the works of Japanese anthropology on Korea and Korean anthropology on Japan in relation to colonial and postcolonial histories and their implications on anthropological practices in both countries. While there have already been some attempts to review Japanese anthropology on Korea in the past, no such attempt has yet been made on Korean anthropology on Japan. It will be attempted in this panel participated by both Japanese and Korean scholars to contextualize the relative status of the past works and to seek possible collaborations between the two Societies in the future.