P082
Citizenship, violence, and power: re-invention of modern nation-states in Africa

Convenors:
Hideyuki Okano (Kindai University)
Gaku Moriguchi (Toyo University)
Chair:
Makoto Nishi
Location:
301 A
Start time:
15 May, 2014 at 15:30
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

This panel reconsiders modern states and national politics in Africa by elucidating the local contexts and the aspects of people's daily lives. It focuses especially on people's experience and their life-history in younger nation-states of Africa, which have been at large since their independences.

Long abstract:

This panel reconsiders modern states and national politics in Africa by elucidating the local contexts and the aspects of people's daily lives. It focuses especially on people's experience and their life-history in younger nation-states of Africa, which have been at large since their independence. Since terms of 'politics' and 'modern nation-state' became one of the topics of socio-cultural anthropology, we have had considerable debates several times among prominent anthropologists. However, modern nation-states, especially in the context of Africa, have been always described as external actors to people's lives. A modern nation-state was imported and has been intervened from the outside of "their" world. That is a typical description in anthropological writings. Even in the particular discussion on the nation-state, the majority of anthropological works have considered people as an actor against the state, or under state's intrusions and influences into their lives. People, with which anthropological works have dealt, have been always subjugated by or resisted against the power of modern nation-states. Especially after Foucault, this tendency has been obvious. Thus, in anthropology, the theories of nation-states have been examined through indirect manners. In the process of modernization and the expansion of modern nation-states in Africa, some of local figures often made themselves engaged in national affairs by their own wills, under the terms of citizenship, democracy, civil wars and development. These figures have been overlooked in a description of previous researches. By examining them, this panel uncovers some aspects of politics and modern nation-states.