P060
Opportunities and challenges for the future of practicing anthropologists

Convenors:
Tomomi Naka (Tottori University)
Sunga Lee
Location:
201 B
Start time:
16 May, 2014 at 8:30
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

Practicing anthropologists are increasingly contributing to public and private sectors. With this increasing presence comes greater opportunities and a greater need for internal reflection. Our panel will explore the issues and opportunities impacting the future of practicing anthropologists.

Long abstract:

Practicing anthropologists have been making inroads into greater spheres of engagement in both public and private sectors as well as non-governmental sectors (see Brondo 2010, Checker 2009). With this increasing presence comes greater opportunities and a greater need for internal reflection. Our panel will explore the issues and opportunities impacting the future of practicing anthropologists, addressing critiques and understandings of a globalizing and innovating field. Using internal and external lenses of theory, research, and action, the panel's goal is to present thought-provoking papers that reflect on trends and future impacts. Questions such as the following are pertinent to the panel's topic: Will practicing anthropology become the public face of anthropology and what will this mean for the discipline? What are the ethical implications of greater access to information and data in the future? What new methods might we see in the future? How will or how should theory interconnect with the practice of anthropology? In what ways will practicing anthropology form new associations within and outside anthropology and diversify? In what areas has practicing anthropology not yet made inroads? Is public engagement a moral obligation of anthropology? What are the future implications of whom practicing anthropologists work for and with? What considerations should be made for the future training and education of practicing anthropologists?