P052
The future with/of Maya anthropology

Convenors:
Kazuo Aoyama (Ibaraki University)
Chair:
Kazuo Aoyama
Discussant:
Junji Koizumi
Location:
204
Start time:
15 May, 2014 at 13:30
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

The panel, the Future with/of Maya Anthropology, will discuss and think about the future of Maya studies as anthropology in general but also as various specialized studies (e.g., archaeology, epigraphy, iconography, physical anthropology, ethnology) covering different areas for debate.

Long abstract:

The panel, the Future with/of Maya Anthropology, will discuss and think about the future of Maya studies as anthropology in general but also as various specialized studies (e.g., archaeology, epigraphy, iconography, lithic study, physical anthropology, zooarchaeology, ethnology) covering different areas for debate. The presenters will summarize anthropological research questions that they have asked in their specialized study and their answers, and propose what should be done in the rest of their career and by next generations of Maya scholars. The papers include: Pasts and Futures in Maya Epigraphy: The Long View (Stephen Houston, Brown University), What dreams may come: A future for the early Maya (William Saturno, University of Boston), Archaeologists and Anthropologists are the Future of Zooarchaeology in the Maya World (Kitty F. Emery, Florida Museum of Natural History), Semiotic Analyses of Maya Lithic Caches: Anthropologies of Technology, Symbolism, and Religion (Zachary Hruby, Northern Kentucky University), A future for Physical Anthropology of the Ancient Maya (Lori Wright, Texas A&M University), Future with/of Maya Anthropology and Maya lithic study as Economic Anthropology (Kazuo Aoyama, Ibaraki University), Transmission of the "soft culture" over generations: Some lessons from Mayan studies (Kazuyasu Ochiai, Hitotsubashi University), Anthropological "reducing" of Mayan languages for their revitalization (Shigeto Yoshida, Tohoku University), Facing Maya Agency: reflections on ethnological studies of contemporary Mayan peoples (Motoi Suzuki, National Museum of Ethnology, Japan), Clothes as mutual communication from the case of Mayan women in Guatemala (Yuko Honya, Keio University).