P051
Hunting, animal welfare, and defence against wildlife attack (NME panel)

Convenors:
Atsushi Nobayashi (National Museum of Ethnology, Japan)
Location:
103
Start time:
17 May, 2014 at 8:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

In this panel we will discuss hunting practices and their cultural transmission globally, with particular regard to animal welfare and defending agricultural areas against wildlife attack.

Long abstract:

In this panel we will discuss hunting practices and their cultural transmission globally, with particular regard to animal welfare and defending agricultural areas or human life against wildlife attack. Traditional or subsistence hunting and related activities by indigenous peoples and professional hunters have decreased globally, in recent years. At the same time, we can see the continuity of hunting as a hobby, in forms such as trophy and sport hunting, and an act of defending agricultural areas against wildlife attack. Modern hunting activities, traditional and otherwise, are practiced to acquire meat for survival, for certain human mental desires or satisfactions, to maintain economic activities, and for the safety of human life. Hunting is generally premised on directly claiming the life of an animal, and can conflict with various concerns for animal welfare or survival. The panel will try to foresee the future of hunting by comparing, in a range of social contexts, the views of hunters, the cultural transmission of hunting practices, inheritance and innovation in hunting skills, the treatment and uses of meat and other animal products, and relationships between hunters and others.