P048
Landscape as cultural production by social practices in space and time (CLOSED - 5)

Convenors:
Hideyuki Onishi
Chair:
Hideyuki Onishi, Associate Professor, Doshisha Women’s College of Liberal Arts
Location:
103
Start time:
18 May, 2014 at 8:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel examines various kinds of landscape through ethnographical analyses of social practices. In particular, it will focus on the formation process of landscape. The objective of this panel is to comprehend politics and/or ideology pursuing practice as the driving force of landscape formation.

Long abstract:

Landscape, at present, has been attracting a great deal of attention related to the conservation of natural resources and/or cultural properties which are represented by the UNESCO World Heritage sites. Thus, various research fields in the natural sciences, humanities and social sciences have been conducting landscape studies. However, it can be pointed out the studies in the humanities are mainly symbolic analysis and linguistic approaches. Anthropological studies also are an important part of this trend although their perspective and research methodology are different. On the other hand, this panel examines various kinds of landscape through ethnographical analyses of social practices in daily life. In particular, it will focus on the formation process of landscape. Therefore, some papers investigate the market space as trading post, the place as common property, the starlit sky for celestial navigation, and other topics which are not usually taken up in landscape studies. In addition to this, indigenous knowledge, technologies, customs and systems concerned with those practices shall be the main subjects of each investigation. These studies will point to politics and/or ideology pursuing practice as the driving force of landscape formation. At the same time, each paper attempts to grasp the gaps and differences between practice and narrative. The objective of this panel is not to criticize existing landscape studies based on symbolic analysis and linguistic approaches, but to supplement those by new perspectives and methods of practice analysis through ethnographic research.