P037
Comparative ethnography of 'inclusion' in Nepal: discourses, activities, and life-worlds

Convenors:
Katsuo Nawa (The University of Tokyo)
Discussant:
Lokranjan Parajuli, Tatsuro Fujikura
Location:
301 B
Start time:
15 May, 2014 at 8:30
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This panel attempts to grasp various aspects of social dynamics in post-"Maoist Insurgency"/"People's War" Nepal through the concept of "inclusion." We analyze the discourses on and practices for (or against) "inclusion" within the context of daily life of various people in Nepal ethnographically.

Long abstract:

This panel attempts to grasp and analyze various aspects of social dynamics in post-"Maoist Insurgency"/"People's War" Nepal through the concept of "inclusion." Being a globally circulating concept with its distinct aura of legitimacy and politically correctness, "inclusion" has often been treated as a key word to deal with post-conflict states and societies under post-Cold War, "neoliberal" world. The concept, together with "samaveshikaran," the Nepali word coined as its equivalent, has been highly relevant in Nepal especially since 2006, though various diversities and inequalities within the state have existed throughout the history of modern Nepal. Much has been already argued, debated, and written on Nepal using the concept of inclusion, both in Nepali and in English, by scholars, policy makers, journalists, activists, social workers, and representatives and members of various groups. Unlike many of these arguments, however, the aim of this panel is not to assess the degree of "inclusion" of various sectors in Nepal. Rather, we try to relocate the discourses on and practices for (or against) "inclusion" (or in some cases their absence) within the context of daily life of various people in Nepal ethnographically. Based on the result of long-term fieldwork, each presenter shows entangled relations between various movements in the name of intermediate groups, often mediated by relatively new globally circulating concepts such as "indigenous peoples," on the one hand, and life worlds of various people, including activists, on the other, in terms of "inclusion/samaveshikaran."