P032
Transnational migration, kinship and relatedness

Convenors:
Victor Hugo Martins Kebbe Silva (Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar))
Location:
101b
Start time:
15 May, 2014 at 17:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

Considering the historical migration that already lasted more than 105 years, this panel discusses the relations between Brazil and Japan, analyzing the challenges that arise for the notions of family and Kinship. We aim to understand the ways in which Kinship is built in this transnational context.

Long abstract:

The migratory phenomenon brings unprecedented issues for the Social Sciences. Notions of territoriality, nation-state, race, ethnicity and identity are analytical categories particularly sensitive when confronted by the intense movement of people across the globe, especially family and kinship. Within this perspective of transnational migration and to confront the distance, we face the transformation and even the emergence of new family arrangements, bringing new issues to think Kinship in Anthropological Theory. The purpose of this panel is to discuss precisely those displacements, kinship and the ways on how this family arrangements are constructed in this transnational context, adopting Janet Carsten's key concept of "relatedness" as a new way to address the issue. Considering the historical migration that already lasted more than 105 years, this panel discusses the relations between Brazil and Japan, analyzing the challenges that arise for the notions of Japanese family and kinship.