Accepted paper:

The Jar and Coffin Burials of the Cardamom Mountains, Cambodia: Lifeways of a Highland People

Authors:

Nancy Beavan (University of Otago)
Derek Hamilton (University of Glasgow)
Alison Carter (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Tep Sokha
Peter Grave (Archaeology, University of New England)
Kerry Sayle (University of Glasgow)
Michael Gantley (Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology)

Paper short abstract:

The 15th to 17th Century AD Jar and Coffin Burials of the Cardamom Mountains, which now number ten sites throughout the Cardamom massif, reveal Highland mortuary practices of a people far removed from the influences of the late to post-Angkor culture of the lowlands.

Paper long abstract:

The 15th to 17th Century AD Jar and Coffin Burials of the Cardamom Mountains, which now number ten sites throughout the Cardamom massif, reveal Highland mortuary practices of a people far removed from the influences of the late to post-Angkor culture of the lowlands (Beavan et al. 2015). The use of maritime trade-ware ceramics which are linked to the Koh S'Dech shipwreck and to the Mae Nam Noi / Singburi kilns of Ayutthaya (Beavan et al. 2012, Tep unpublished data, Grave et al unpublished data) and other trade items such as glass beads, and simple metal rings point to previously unknown trade connections between highlanders and multiple trade sources (Carter et al., in press). Bioarchaeological information from the skeletal analyses reveal ancient diet and population origins. We have also found the first biological evidence of probable scurvy in Southeast Asia (Halcrow et al. 2014) as well as examples of the cultural practice of dental ablation in the Late to post-Angkor period. These findings have shed light on the previously unknown life ways of a highland culture in the 15th to 17th centuries, and contribute to our understanding of lesser- known aspects of the Cambodian archaeological record.

Refs:

Beavan et al.2012. https://seasianceramics.asia.si.edu/resiurces/essay.asp?id= 218

Beavan et al. 2015. Radiocarbon, 57(1):1-17

Carter AK, Dussubieux L, Beavan N. In Press. Archaeometry

Halcrow et al. 2014.Int. J. Paleopathology 5:63-71.

panel P21
Exploring the Archaeology of Everyday Living in Southeast Asia