P18
Print journalism in modern South Asia

Convenors:
Amelia Bonea (University of Oxford)
Michael Mann (Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin)
Location:
Room 111
Start time:
28 July, 2016 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel aims to expand the repertoire of historical scholarship on print journalism in South Asia by focusing on little explored topics such as genres of journalism, journalism education, professionalization, advertising, theories of the press, copyright, technology, and sensationalism.

Long abstract:

The newspaper press has been a popular area of investigation for historians of South Asia, as demonstrated by the impressive number of histories of the press and journalism published in the post-independence period. Despite this substantial record of publication, there has been little theoretical and methodological variation in the way histories of journalism have been written. For a long time scholars have followed the tradition of 'effect research'; it is only in recent years that the study of journalism in South Asia has begun to be infused with the concerns of other fields of inquiry such as book history, the history of telecommunications, and global history. This panel proposes to revisit the history of journalism in modern South Asia at a time when practices and ideas of journalism are undergoing significant changes around the world. We invite papers which draw attention to the wide variety of journalistic practice in the Indian subcontinent and help us to expand the repertoire of historical scholarship on print journalism. Contributions should cover the period from the late eighteenth century until the Emergency. Potential topics include, but are not limited to: genres of journalism (science and medical journalism, cultural journalism, political journalism, business journalism, literary journalism), journalism education, the professionalization of journalism, theories of the press, technologies of journalism, journalism and copyright, advertising, anonymity, sensationalism, press correspondents, and press clubs.