Accepted paper:

The role of faith based organizations' health care service on morality in urban Dar es Salaam: a case of African Muslim agency and Efatha ministry

Authors:

Mussa Muhoja (University of Dar es Salaam)

Paper short abstract:

The provisions of health care services by FBOs contain religious belief, values, experiences, identities, emotions and practices that can best serve as resources for responding to changing circumstances of the moral issues in the urban context.

Paper long abstract:

In recent years, the highly integration of faith based organisations into health care has been embedded in the wider reconfiguration of Tanzania's social welfare system from the early 1980s' onward, shaped by the decline of the postcolonial welfare state, the growing privatization and "NGOization" of the health sector. Furthermore, the development of urbanisations, globalization, modernity and the values of urban life has resulted into the weakening of moral values and ethical aspect in the contemporary society. Using ethnographic case study of African Muslim Agency and Efatha Ministry in Urban Dar es Salaam, I argue that Faith Based Organisations have been engaged in the Provisions of health care service that address the moral issues "intersubjectively". I further argue that, the provisions of health care services by Faith Based Organisations in Urban Dar es Salaam sharpen both religious and professional values of its health care workers while at the same time influencing on the cultural and religious acceptable moral of its beneficiaries about health issues. In addition to that, I further argue that, belief, values, experiences, identities, emotions and practices embodied in religious traditions can best serve as resources for responding to changing circumstances of the moral issues. Lastly, I argue that, although the moral aspect of the FBOs health care resemble with the secular guidelines largely, but the two has minor differences.

panel Rel08
Religious organizations as moral agents in urban Africa