Accepted paper:

Extractivism, development and violence(s) in Northern Mozambique: Cabo Delgado province as a case-study

Authors:

Manuel Barroso Sevillano (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
Jokin Alberdi Bidaguren (University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU)
Eduardo Bidaurratzaga (University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU))

Paper short abstract:

This work analyzes the socio-economic dynamics generated around the 'extractive boom' and the development programs in the province of Cabo Delgado from a historical perspective. It also tries to provide some keys in order to (re)think future alternatives for the province and its citizens.

Paper long abstract:

The history of Mozambique is full of episodes where different kinds of conflicts, natural resources exploitation dynamics and development initiatives have coexisted with greater or lesser fortune. In the last decades, after more than 25 years since the end of the civil war, several social, economic and political transformations have taken place in the country. These range from relative improvements in some basic development indicators, to high rates of economic growth as well as the increasing attraction of foreign investment, infrastructures rehabilitation etc. All of this has coexisted with a progressive reduction of donor aid dependency, high rates of poverty and low levels of governance and transparency in public management. One of the most significant changes behind these realities is linked to the massive exploration and exploitation of mineral resources in recent decades, which includes ruby, graphite and gas investing and extraction operations in the province of Cabo Delgado. The new scenario has generated huge expectations of improvement in the living conditions among the local population, as well as frustration and different kind of violence(s) related to the breach of these expectations. This work analyzes the socio-economic dynamics generated around the 'extractive boom' and the development programs in the province of Cabo Delgado from a historical perspective. Lastly it tries to provide some keys in order to (re)think future alternatives for the province and its citizens.

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