A13
Of other landscapes

Convenors:
Endre Danyi (Goethe University Frankfurt)
Michaela Spencer (Charles Darwin University)
Format:
Location:
Bowland North Seminar Room 6
Start time:
28 July, 2018 at 9:30
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

We invite contributions that engage with situations where worlds meet, including worlds configured within differing practices of Indigenous and Western knowledge traditions, practices of governance and democracy, and other means of knowing and relating people and place.

Long abstract:

Where do worlds meet, and how? What count as good or bad meetings of worlds? And what are the implications of such meetings for analysis and politics? In this panel, we address these questions by focusing on 'landscapes' as both the objects of and the conditions for the meeting of worlds (ontologies, cosmologies, normativities). Although a 19th century variant of the term carries its own agenda (including aesthetic coherence, an outsider gaze, and a romantic fascination with the sublime), in the early 21st century it seems possible - and indeed necessary - to talk 'of other landscapes': heterotopic formations that point beyond environmentalism or urban fantasies of recreation, and accommodate meetings without presuming the settings in which they occur. The title of the panel is an indirect reference to Michel Foucault, who in his essay 'Of Other Spaces' defined heterotopias as places where different, seemingly incommensurable logics or orderings encounter each other. Though he argued that heterotopias are ubiquitous, his examples - cemeteries, zoological gardens, vacation villages - typically came from the (European) West. Our aim is to push this line of inquiry further and empirically explore moments and locations where different, seemingly incommensurable worlds encounter each other. We therefore invite contributions that engage with situations where worlds meet, including worlds configured within differing practices of Indigenous and Western knowledge traditions, practices of governance and democracy, and other means of knowing and relating people and place.