T123
Re-configuring Knowledge Practices: Folding Margins and Norms into Dynamic Hybridity
Convenors:
Ellen Foster (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute)
Karin Patzke (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute)
Chair:
Ellen Foster ((Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute), Karin Patzke (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute), Tania Pérez Bustos (Universidad Nacional de Colombia)
Discussant:
Tania Pérez Bustos (Universidad Nacional de Colombia)
Stream:
Tracks
Location:
112b
Start time:
3 September, 2016 at 14:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

The papers and material enactments included in this session examine the practices of creating and implementing alternative knowledge practices. Participants speak to and perform craftwork and methods of science and engineering to uncover fractured histories and present alternative futures.

Long abstract:

This closed session enlivens knowledges of science, engineering, and craftwork histories rooted in feminist politics of fracture (Barad 2008; Haraway 1988) through examinations of dynamic and hybrid alternative practices. Existing STS scholarship examines how material practices characterize the construction of knowledge about the world (Coopmans et al 2014, Carusi et al 2015), as well as how the praxis of imagining the future influences epistemic communities to produce knowledge (Fujimura 2003, Fortun and Fortun 2005, and Jasanoff and Kim 2009). However, from the early punchcards of the Jacquard loom to the female Navajo weavers working in semiconductor plants a century later (Nakamura 2014), histories of craft disrupt and underlie modern cultures of expert practice. Despite their crucial influence, these histories have been under-recognized within ontologies of hacking, design and collective future making. In these papers, participants critically think and practice together through craft, weaving, video and narrative history the alternative politics fractured from normative constructs of expertise. Drawing on feminist science studies (Suchman 2006; Nakamura & Haraway 2003), critical craft studies (Adamson 2010; Lippard 2010 [1978]) and studies of feminist knowledge practices (Gibson-Graham 1996, Bardzell 2010), participants examine omitted, erased and hybrid practices of craft in science and engineering to imagine a future through shared and cultivated praxis. In this experimental panel, we invite interactive participation as we traverse histories of alternative knowledge practices by actually engaging in those practices to collectively imagine the future.