T094
Emerging science and technology : questioning the regime of promising
Convenors:
Marc Aud├ętat (University of Lausanne)
Pierre-Benoit Joly (INRA / UPEM)
Harro van Lente (Maastricht University)
Stream:
Tracks
Location:
VIP
Start time:
2 September, 2016 at 14:00
Session slots:
6

Short abstract:

This track invites papers examining the regime of promising in emerging science and technology, dealing with issues of performance and credibility. It aims at fostering discussion about the issues and consequences of the regime of promising for the research system as well as for society.

Long abstract:

Promises, future visions, expectations, imaginaries, are not merely accompanying, they are also shaping modern science and technology. They support scientific enthusiasm and stimulate competition, raise financial resources, and orient research funds. In particular emerging science and technology rely on the production and circulation of promises, since they apply to competitive funds. As a result, since the start of big national programs on biotechnology, nanotechnology, brain research, personalised medicine, synthetic biology, etc., a regime of techno-scientific promises came to stabilize and dominate the whole system of research. Future visions, stories, and technological promises have been increasingly forged and brought to public attention. This economy of promises is steering speculative bubbles ; it induces misunderstandings about expectations and temporality ; it is adding pressure on researchers and tensions in science ; and it is questioning the governance of research and of sociotechnical change. This track invites papers examining the regime of promising in various emerging science and technology, looking at rules and practices in current domains, dealing with issues of performance and of credibility, as well as papers about organizations, discourses and practices of the regime of promises, papers comparing it across countries and technoscientific domains. In this track we want to critically analyse the regime of techno-scientific promises, to analyse how it evolves over time, as well as papers about the critics and the alternatives. It aims at fostering discussion about the issues and consequences of the regime of promising for the research system as well as for society.

Accepted papers: