T063
Monitoring Circulation
Convenors:
Jess Bier (Erasmus University Rotterdam)
Willem Schinkel (Erasmus University Rotterdam)
Chair:
Jess Bier
Discussant:
Sally Wyatt (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts & Sciences - KNAW)
Stream:
Tracks
Location:
117a
Start time:
2 September, 2016 at 14:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

The papers in this track analyze the politics of counting and visualizing in efforts to monitor the global circulation of people, practices, and data. The goal is to further examine the relationships between circulation infrastructure and supranational efforts at regulation and surveillance.

Long abstract:

This track analyzes the politics of counting and visualizing in the monitoring of the global circulation of people, practices, and data. Researchers are increasingly examining the circulation of technoscience and its spread into non-traditional domains like governance and finance. However, the agents, targets, infrastructures, visions, and techniques of governmentality also circulate beyond local borders. So it is necessary to further examine the relationships between circulation infrastructure and supranational efforts at regulation and surveillance. How do visualization practices perform and produce international flows, and vice versa? Which social imaginations are reinforced, and which erased, through circulation infrastructure? How does monitoring challenge older spatial and territorial models? How do histories of circulation and stasis, including colonial legacies, help set the conditions of possibility for the circulation of technoscience? How are auditing, evaluation, and big data reshaping scientific practices? How do we study monitoring and circulation, and which methods fail to grasp them? Topics include: - standardization and quality assurance in the circulation of science - distributed vision in the routinized work of the quantitative assessments of populations - surveillance technologies and the shaping of migrant and refugee flows - auditing and evaluation in institutional governance, including corporations and universities - rethinking of methods, including ANT (Latour), spider (Ingold), and notions of 'multisitedness' - quantification and erasure in the circulation of science across the global South and North - the production of stability and flow through infrastructures of circulation - the role of international technical expertise in the evaluation of knowledge