T010
Stakeholder engagement in smart city (re-)development
Convenors:
Tally Hatzakis (Open University)
Susan Winter (University of Maryland)
Stream:
Tracks
Location:
117a
Start time:
3 September, 2016 at 9:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

We invite interdisciplinary insights, methods and best practices on citizen and informal social networks engagement on smart city (re-)development.

Long abstract:

The track objective is to discuss the various ways in which stakeholder groups, particularly citizen groups and social enterprises, engage in smart city development. We consider cities as effective boundary objects, structured and stable enough to to organise activities and support work practices, yet malleable enough to support a number of different activities and practices to coalesce. Hence, cities can support the development of shared representations, cooperation and mobilisation of resources for collective (Levinia and Vaast, 2005; Bergman et al., 2007). As such, their redesign provides a grand challenges requiring various situated practices (Farías 2011). Faced with the many social, environmental and economic challenges posed by increasing rates of urbanisation and social change, smart cities across the globe seek to utilise information technologies to improve their overall 'look and feel' and functionality. This provides the kind of large-scale and broad scope, grand, challenge that demands everyone's attention and more so citizen participation. Hence, we invite scholars with various backgrounds - social scientists, technology and humanities experts, city planners, political scientists and many more, to discuss processes of stakeholder engagement in smart city urban development - governance, design, participation, policy, mobility, smart technologies, infrastructures, master planning and urban (re-) development. Emphasis will be given to engagement methodologies and case studies, particularly those involving citizens - citizen groups, social enterprises and informal social networks, as well as evaluative research.