T001
Materializing governance by information infrastructure
Convenors:
Annalisa Pelizza (University of Twente)
Francesca Musiani (CNRS - Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Stefania Milan (University of Amsterdam)
Stream:
Tracks
Location:
114
Start time:
1 September, 2016 at 16:00
Session slots:
5

Short abstract:

Governance by technology", "governance by design", "politics of technology", "de-facto governance": this panel investigates similar conceptualizations as an attempt to frame the need to uncover regimes of inclusion/exclusion nested in technical details of information infrastructures.

Long abstract:

Governance by technology", "governance by design", "politics of technology", "de-facto governance": these conceptualizations constitute an attempt to frame the need to uncover regimes of inclusion/exclusion nested in technical details. From Lessig's formulation of "code as law" to DeNardis' "protocol politics", from Bowker and Star's "infrastructural inversion" to Galloways' protocol-based "virtual bureaucracies", information infrastructures have been recognized as privileged locus to make the material embeddedness of political arrangements visible. Yet the governing materiality of information infrastructure is often bypassed in recent accounts about "information flows", the anti-hermeneutics of "big data", and the possibilities of "cloud computing". This track has two main goals. Firstly, it aims to further the field of governance by information technologies by providing a compendium of digital artefacts that subtend to the creation of new actors. How do algorithms contribute to change governance dynamics? How do web services help stabilize emerging actors? How do internet protocols represent de-facto governance? Secondly, the track seeks to investigate how the notion of "governance" can tackle current developments in the fields of cloud computing, cybersecurity and internet governance/policymaking. How can the governance of innovation and technological change be apprehended? Is "governance" a trait proper to a given artifact in its stabilized form, or does it evolve along with it? To what extent can we enlarge the notion of governance to uses, practices, informal communities, without it becoming too much of an all-encompassing notion? How is the public/private dichotomy reconfigured as a result of these developments? SESSIONS: 4/5/5/5/4

Accepted papers: