Plenary A
Anthropological knowledge production and the narratives, regimes and governance of mobility

Convenors:
Sarah Green (University of Helsinki)
Martin Fotta (Charles University Prague)
Ayse Caglar (University of Vienna)
Miguel Vale de Almeida (ISCTE, Lisbon)
Format:
Panels
Location:
Aula Magna-Auditorium
Start time:
15 August, 2018 at 14:30
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

TBA

Long abstract:

Questions about the impact of an unprecedented increase in the flow of goods, capital and people for social relations, borders, formation of subjectivities, as well their governance and regulation, have come to the fore in recent years within anthropology, as in several other disciplines. On the one hand, the concept of “mobility” acquired prominence as an analytical concept to address and capture the workings of these flows, while on the other hand the concept simultaneously provided fertile ground for critical engagement, both in terms of its use in anthropology, and in terms of its place within regimes of governance, in the imaginaries of nation-states, and in regulatory schemes across multiple scales. Depending on their positionality, anthropologists explored the questions of what kinds of mobilities acquire value, when, for whom, and within what kind of power relations from within different terrains of conceptual, academic and political legacies. How does the discipline of anthropology broaden and shift the research agenda in this field? In what way does it displace prevailing conceptualizations and in what way does its practice enact a specific vision of the world? This plenary drawn upon the prominent but also the critical and variegated scholarship not only on the “staying, moving, settling” of people, but also of capital, information, and organizations in different parts of the world as an entry point to scrutinize anthropological knowledge production, its entanglements with histories and power structures. The plenary aims to focus on the anthropological narratives entangled with the enactment and the governance of mobility of people, goods, information and capital, and the borderings and essentialisations that accompany them, to reflect critically on the location of anthropological knowledge.