Accepted paper:

EASA: mission accomplished?

Authors:

Adam Kuper (Boston University)

Paper short abstract:

EASA’s founders had various aims: to develop the institutional basis of social anthropology in Europe; to encourage research dealing with modern European concerns; to support the development of a shared theoretical discourse, rooted in the social sciences; and to increase the visibility of our discipline. Have we succeeded?

Paper long abstract:

What were we after when we established the EASA a quarter of a century ago? There were several concerns, not equally shared, not all clearly formulated. One was the need to shore up the institutional basis of the discipline in Europe, and to develop European networks that worked against the established centre-periphery structures. Another was to encourage research programmes that engaged with modern European concerns. A third was to support the development of a shared theoretical discourse, rooted in the social sciences. A fourth was to increase our visibility, not least to other disciplines. Looking back, how have we done? And what should our priorities be now?

panel Plenary A
EASA beyond crises: continuities and innovations in European anthropology