Accepted paper:

Being in sound: reflections on recording while practicing aikido and shakuhachi

Authors:

Tamara Kohn (University of Melbourne)
Richard Chenhall (University of Melbourne)

Paper short abstract:

This presentation examines both a methodological conundrum and an ethnographic analysis of how one’s position within and beyond the production of sound and movement affects one’s experience.

Paper long abstract:

This presentation examines both a methodological conundrum and an ethnographic analysis of how one's position within and beyond the production of sound and movement affects one's experience. We draw from sonic field research in Japan with aikido and shakuhachi practitioners. Initially we will examine some of the methodological implications of how practice in both of these contexts affects sensory awareness. These will be considered against a different modality of sound that is captured electronically and reflected upon by people who were or were not involved in the production of the sound. Finally we will begin to provide a relational framework for understanding how bodily 'being in sound' contributes to a multi-sensory and dynamic process of self-production.

panel P035
Collaborative intimacies in music and dance: anthropologies in/of sound and movement