P109
Collaborating in the field: participatory forms of anthropological research (re)examined

Convenors:
Liza Debevec (International Water Management Institute)
Anja Katharina Salzer (Free University of Bolzano)
Location:
T-409
Start time:
2 August, 2014 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

This panel aims to bring together anthropologists from academia and development organisations to examine the new ways in which participatory ways of approaching anthropological research can help us better engage with our informants and create collaborative forms of anthropological knowledge

Long abstract:

This panel aims to bring together anthropologists from academia and development organisations to examine the new ways in which participatory ways of approaching anthropological research can help us better engage with our informants and create collaborative forms of anthropological knowledge. It intends to critically engage with, and (re)examine ways in which anthropologists working both in academia and development world use various participatory methods in their research and what such participation entails. As Cornwall and Jewkes have suggested in 1995 seminal piece on participatory research, the aim of such an approach is to "focus on locally defined priorities and local perspectives". They further pointed to the issue of the "location of power in the various stages of the research process." (1995:1668). In the panel we wish to discuss the challenges to participatory research and how these can be overcome by understanding the complexities of power relations between the researcher and the community and even more importantly the complex power relations within the communities that we as anthropologists engage with. We welcome contributions from anthropologists from various backgrounds and papers that discuss participatory approach from either a more theoretical perspective or focusing on specific forms of participatory approach used in the field, both in applied and non-applied forms of anthropological engagement. We particularly encourage contributions that are of collaborative nature and that have been written (or possibly filmed) using innovative techniques and are a result of cross-disciplinary, cross-cultural collaboration.