P008
The edgy Northern European imaginaries: cultural identity through the looking glass of fabulous ancestors and ludic realities

Convenors:
Iain Edgar (Durham University)
T├Ánno Jonuks (Estonian Literary Museum)
Format:
Panels
Location:
M-649
Start time:
3 August, 2014 at 9:00
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This panel analyses the historical and contemporary experience of the Northern European imaginaries and the cultural identities formed through the experience of (in)visible phenomena. The panel will unite the analytical resources of social anthropology, folkloristic and religious studies.

Long abstract:

This panel intends to illuminate the distinctive historical and contemporary experience of the various Northern European imaginaries and the resultant cultural and national identities formed through the experience and study of (in)visible phenomena from antiquity to modern times. Such (in)visible realities are an important part of the cultural imaginary, and personal and collective identities of almost any folk community. The panel aims to study those issues on the basis of Celtic, Norse, Balto-Finnic, Slavic and Scandinavian peoples and will unite the analytical and technological resources of social anthropology, folkloristic and religious studies. The panel will analyse the warp and the weft of interaction between personal, experiential imaginative creativity and the social and collective imaginary, and the accompanying embodied praxis of a specific set of Northern European identies. Archival and ethnographic studies are equally welcome, as are studies of the making of a communicative personal and social imaginative identity amongst diasporic Northern European communities. How the named mythological 'unconscious' of such communities intersects with immigrant populations, who often have their own visionary traditions and practices, is also an intended theme. The anticipated outcome, indeed the elixir, will be the theorising and demonstration of the creative and specific interaction between personal and cultural imaginative forms and consequent individual and collective identities.