P080
Same-sex sexualities and ethnic minorities in Europe (Network for the Anthropology of Gender and Sexuality and the European Network for Queer Anthropology)

Convenors:
Wim Peumans (University of the Witwatersrand)
Luca Bartozzi (Birkbeck College, University of London)
Linda Sólveigar Guðmundsdóttir (University of Iceland)
Chair:
Mark Graham
Discussant:
Mark Graham
Stream:
Panels
Location:
S-420
Start time:
2 August, 2014 at 9:00
Session slots:
2

Short abstract:

In an effort to further queer our understandings of diaspora and ethnicity, the panel aims to focus on ethnographic research on same-sex sexualities and ethnic minorities in Europe and is interested in diasporic queers' participation in queer spaces, and particularly in forms of activism.

Long abstract:

Within several European countries the acceptance of same-sex sexuality has become a litmustest for newcomers, especially where it concerns the opinions of Muslims on the topic. In political, public and media debates the so-called homophobic and conservative Muslim is frequently played out against the enlightened, homotolerant European. Within LGBT and Queer Studies, sexual non-normativity has often been represented in delimiting and restrictive ways as white, middle-class, male, secular and belonging to a particular nation-state. Increasingly scholars have focused same-sex sexualities, migration and ethnicity in a European context, although an anthropological approach is often missing from this body of scholarship. This panel looks at the multiple modalities in which same-sex sexualities exist within ethnic, migrant and diasporic minorities in Europe. It seeks to bring together scholars whose research projects focus on the lives and lived experiences of lesbians, gays, bisexuals, transgender and queer persons with ethnic minority or diasporic backgrounds. The panel welcomes academics who interrogate the performance and embodiment of sexual subjectivities in a context of (cultural) racism, discrimination, homo - and heteronormativity and is interested in diasporic queers' participation in homonormative queer spaces, and particularly in forms of activism, resistance and collaboration (such as gay pride parades for example). The panel questions how such research theoretically and epistemologically challenges concepts from LGBT and Queer Studies (for example, coming out). The panel is affiliated with the Network for the Anthropology of Gender and Sexuality (NAGS) and the European Network for Queer Anthropology (ENQA).