P053
Global appropriation of bio-resources and its impacts on local people in international perspective

Convenors:
Karin Marita Naase (University of Marburg)
Roberto Araujo (INPE)
Stream:
Panels
Location:
S-412
Start time:
3 August, 2014 at 9:00
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

What are mechanisms of the (international) appropriation of bio-resources in remote areas? How does the state communicate these processes to the local people and how does it conduce them? To what extent and in what ways do local people have room to manoeuver in these settings?

Long abstract:

During the last two decades humanity has witnessed an increasing privatization of bio-resources (land, forests, water resources, minerals, etc.) around the globe, accompanied by overt international competition to commoditize and globalize natural resources. The planet's last bio-sphere sanctuaries have become commodities and currently, relatively remote local peoples are suffering from drastic alterations of their natural and socio-cultural habitats. At the same time, the state, in different national settings, has greatly extended its visibility, facilitating the transformation of bio-resources into commodities. These developments shred local people's physical and symbolic maps of belonging, weakening social bonds and impacting social organizations as the imposed changes convert local peoples' livelihood systems. In this context, different social actors and organizations and their different cosmologies of the involved actors compete with each other for the resources. Against this background, we propose a panel that will be guided by the following research questions: What are the mechanisms of the (international) appropriation of bio-resources in remote areas? How does the state communicate these processes to the local people and how does it implement them? To what extent and in what ways do local people have room to manoeuver in these settings? Our panel encourages anthropologists, who study processes of transformation focussed on the encounter of people and the state, on the transformation of commons and bio-resources into commodities and on local peoples' responses and strategies, to submit their abstract. Our own regional focus is the Amazon, but we strongly encourage contributions situated in other regions.