W118
The role of education in transnational youth migration (EN)

Convenors:
Karen Fog Olwig (University of Copenhagen)
Vered Amit (Concordia University)
Discussant:
Caroline Knowles
Location:
V301
Start time:
11 July, 2012 at 11:30
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

This session examines the role of migration for education - including both formal education and practical training - as an integrated part of migrants' and their families' livelihood strategies, and the uncertainties, hopes and ambitions for social and physical mobility linked to these strategies.

Long abstract:

In recent years migration for educational purposes has become a global mass phenomenon rather than a privilege of select elites. In Europe the internationalization and commercialization of the educational market, combined with the need for labour in certain occupational niches for youths, has opened up new pathways for young people from developing and post-socialist countries desiring to migrate. This session examines the role of education - ranging from formal education to practical training - as an integrated part of the livelihood strategies of migrants and their families, and the uncertainties, hopes and ambitions for social and physical mobility linked to these strategies. Key questions include: • How do economic and political conditions, family support and individual resources and aspirations in the country of origin motivate young people from developing and post-socialist countries to migrate to the global north, and what role do educational ambitions play in this migration strategy? • What kinds of qualifications and competencies do young migrants acquire formally and informally during their stay abroad? Does this international experience give them qualifications that may improve their social and economic opportunities in their home countries? And how do the migrants' experiences and achievements match their own and their families' expectations of the programmes? • In which ways do young migrants draw on local and transnational social networks in identifying their destination, in organizing their travel and migration, and in mobilizing resources necessary for establishing, maintaining and enhancing their livelihood in new locations?