W086
Deportation, justice and anxiety (EN)

Convenors:
Heike Drotbohm (Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz)
Ines Hasselberg (ICS - University of Minho)
Christin Achermann (University of Neuchâtel)
Stream:
Workshops
Location:
V311
Start time:
11 July, 2012 at 11:30
Session slots:
3

Short abstract:

As a form of expulsion regulating human mobility, deportation is a practice of state power embedded in anxiety, uncertainty, fear and unrest that elicit different perceptions of (un)justice. We call for contributions covering the matter from different geographical sites, angles and perspectives.

Long abstract:

As a form of expulsion regulating human mobility, deportation is a practice of state power embedded in anxiety, uncertainty, fear and unrest that elicit different perceptions of (un)justice. Recent academic work has contributed to a contextualized understanding of the practice of deportation, the 'production' of deportability, and how both are experienced. If deportation policies may be justified by public authorities as measures responding to anxieties over (unregulated) migration, they also bring out uncertainty and unrest to deportable/deported migrants and their families. This panel takes EASA's 2012 conference-theme to call for ethnographies approaching this issue from different geographical sites (contributions examining expulsion by 'non-western' states are particularly welcomed), angles (detention, surveillance, sending/returning countries, tribunals, public policy), and perspectives (government, public-opinion, deportees, activists). We call for contributions covering the matter from a multitude of starting points: What are the historical roots and contemporary continuities of expulsion in national contexts? What are the social logics of detention and 'justice' within multicultural societies? How is deportation reflected in public opinion? What impact deportability and deportation may bear in one's sense of belonging and entitlement? What is the situation and mode of integration of deportees within their family networks, and alleged 'home' communities? How do people cope with and react to the threat of deportation and resulting uncertain future? What are the perceptions of the actors involved in enforcing deportation, e.g. staff of detention centers? What are the experiences of 'untypical deportees' as deported women or minors, and those left behind in the 'host' country?