Accepted paper:

Parenting transnational children

Authors:

Jacqueline Waldren (Oxford University)

Paper short abstract:

Transnational children are actively influencing cultural transitions and can no longer be treated merely as extentions to adult studies. When parents decide to 'go abroad' the concern for their children's welfare, education, and healthcare are salient considerations. 'Labour migrants' unsure of what lies ahead often leave their children with parents or spouse in their countries of origin while 'expats' move with their children and dreams to southern climates.

Paper long abstract:

Based on qualitative studies of 'labour migrants' and expat families in Mallorca, Spain this paper will discuss the difficult issues of parenting transnational children. Cultural differences in the meaning of childhood become evident as parents from varied social, geographical, economic and ethnic backgrounds reveal their perceptions of parenting, education, family, social inclusion and exclusion, and cultural priorities, Children have become increasingly important in social policy issues as their position in society is seen to become more precarious with increased mobility, migration, divorce, domestic violence, single parenting, poverty, etc. Transnational children are actively influencing cultural transitions and can no longer be treated merely as extentions to adult studies.

panel W076
Children and migration in Europe: between new citizenships and transnational families