W035
Indigenous, autochthonous and national identities? Strategic representations, political struggles and epistemological issues (atelier bilingue - anglais et français)

Convenors:
Robert Gibb (Glasgow University)
Quentin Gausset (University of Copenhagen)
Justin Kenrick (University of Edinburgh)
Location:
302
Start time:
27 August, 2008 at 9:00
Session slots:
5

Short abstract:

Under which local conditions, in what ways, by whom, and with what symbolic and material effects are discourses of 'identity' - 'indigenous', 'autochthonous' or 'national' - currently being deployed in the general context of neoliberalism and an intensification of capitalist exploitation?

Long abstract:

FR : Sous quelles conditions locales, de quelle manière, par quels acteurs, et avec quels effets symboliques et matériels les discours d’« identité » - « indigène », « autochtone », ou « nationale » - se déploient-ils actuellement dans le cadre plus général du néo-libéralisme et d’une intensification de l’exploitation capitaliste ? A partir d’enquêtes de terrain dans des pays divers, cet atelier s’efforcera d’apporter quelques éléments de réponse à cette question, et s’interrogera également sur le rôle des anthropologues dans la déconstruction et la reproduction des discours identitaires et des contextes dans lesquels ils prennent leur source. EN: Under which local conditions, in what ways, by whom, and with what symbolic and material effects are discourses of 'identity' - 'indigenous', 'autochthonous' or 'national' - currently being deployed in the general context of neoliberalism and an intensification of capitalist exploitation? What are the similarities, differences, and potential (and real) articulations and tensions between these discourses? How do they relate to issues such as minority rights, decentralisation, legal pluralism, self-determination, anti-racism and the (de-)legitimisation of state power? What epistemological and political issues do these discourses raise for social anthropologists who are attempting to analyse the wider social processes in which they are embedded? When do they open up - and when do they close down - the space for critical scrutiny of these processes? This panel invites case studies from throughout Europe and the world to explore not only the diverse, contradictory and complementary ways in which such notions are currently being used but also the role played by social anthropologists in de-constructing and reproducing both these notions and the wider contexts which give rise to them.

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