Accepted paper:

Challenging post-political nature of global food security governance: strategies from the Committee on World Food Security

Authors:

Jessica Duncan (Wageningen University)

Paper short abstract:

In this paper I interrogate the post-political nature of global food security governance. I present the case of the Committee on World Food Security as a site where such the post-political is challenged and reflect on practices that can re-politicise food security governance.

Paper long abstract:

Food security represents a policy problems for which there is no neutral diagnosis. Yet, within policy-making arenas the source of the problem (e.g. not enough food), a shared vision for the future (e.g. food security), and often the steps to take us there (e.g. produce more food) are all taken for granted. Beyond that, the marker of success in intergovernmental negotiations is arriving at a shared (intergovernmentally negotiated) vision and policy. This erasing of dissent and push for global consensus are indicative of what scholars have characterised as the post-political condition. In line with this, a key assumption of this paper is that a commitment to a universal and rational consensus on what makes a just and sustainable food future is both inadequate and potentially dangerous. In this paper, I interrogate the post-political nature of global food security governance in the current era of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. I argue that key political reflexive practices and mechanisms can help to (re)politicise food security governance processes. I present the case of the UN's reformed Committee on World Food Security as a site where such practices are playing out. I conclude by reflecting on how such practices can prompt a re-politicization of food security governance and in doing so, open up new possibilities for just and sustainable food futures.

panel P07
Reclaiming the political: reflections on the tactics and strategies of actors in the quest for just and sustainable food governance