Accepted paper:

The Developmental State of the 21st Century: Accounting for State and Society

Authors:

Jennifer Hsu (University of Alberta)

Paper short abstract:

This paper will assess China's developmental state within a broader theory of what outcomes represent "development" post-2015; and, what factors and partnerships are most crucial to generate these results.

Paper long abstract:

Whether China fits the East Asian developmental state model has been the subject of scholarly discussion over the last decade. This paper's point of departure is to assess China's developmental state within a broader theory of what outcomes represent "development" and what partnerships are most crucial to generate these results in a post-2015 environment. While the technocracy, industrial policies, and subsequent industrial transformation are still important elements to a developmental state, the empirical realities of the concept have moved beyond these elements. As development is no longer simply conceived of as economic growth, but also encapsulating human development, the role of the developmental state must be rethought. Focusing on the state's ability to deliver collective goods, these goods such as welfare have become an important task for developing and developed nations alike, and nowhere is this more important than in China. With a rapidly aging population, inadequate social safety nets for marginalised groups, the success of the Chinese developmental state requires new dynamics between state and society to deliver services to various segments of society. Consequently, intimate connections between the political and industrial elites are no longer sufficient and may actually be counterproductive to the success of the developmental state. This paper will advocate for a developmental state framework that accounts for an emphasis on human development using China as a case study to contemplate the how and why a re-thinking of the developmental state framework is necessary.

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