Accepted paper:

Negotiating culture, space and identity: how non-traditional and innovative methods can support interviews with children

Authors:

Kabita Chakraborty (University of Melbourne)

Paper short abstract:

In this paper I explore some of the variables scholars have to negotiate when conducting interviews with children in their everyday lives. It explores the conflicts researchers negotiate when maintaining respect for a participants’ culture, while ensuring a child’s right to participate is met. The paper showcases the importance of mixed qualitative and innovative methods in giving children multiple voices to ensure participation, and ends with a strong call for the further development of non-traditional and novel methods in research with children.

Paper long abstract:

In this paper I explore some of the variables scholars have to negotiate when conducting interviews with children in their everyday lives. Drawing on several child-centred research projects conducted in India, the paper will detail some of the methodological strategies employed when interviewing children in their everyday environments. I will explore some of the methods I have used when interviewing children when parents and other gatekeepers are present; in focus groups where the nature of the topic is considered to be risky; and in situations where children feel they need to maintain their normative identity of 'a good child'. This exploration highlights the ethical dilemmas many academics face in trying to research the lived experiences of children in certain cultural contexts. It explores the conflicts researchers negotiate when maintaining respect for a participants' culture, while ensuring a child's right to participate is met. The paper showcases the importance of mixed qualitative and innovative methods in giving children multiple voices to ensure participation, and ends with a strong call for the further development of non-traditional and novel methods in research with children.

panel P08
Methods and ethics in 'interviewing' children