B4
Large-scale tourism in small-scale societies

Convenors:
Patrick Neveling (University of Bergen)
Carsten Wergin (Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg)
Stream:
Series B: Political economy/development
Location:
TM144
Start time:
11 April, 2007 at 14:30
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

The panel addresses holiday destinations where large numbers of tourists encounter local communities with dense networks in the realms of kinship, culture, economy, and politics. Papers from all areas are welcome. A focus on the notion of scale from a historical perspective is especially encouraged.

Long abstract:

In global tourism marketing, remoteness is one of the best selling images for holiday destinations. Be they small island paradises, sparsely populated mountain, desert, or forest areas - seclusion from the hassle of the age of mass communication on the one hand, and the promise of the 'native's cosiness' on the other attract large crowds each year. From an anthropological perspective these destinations all share certain features: Local societies are small in scale, characterised by dense networks in the realms of kinship, culture, politics, and economy whereas tourism is not only large scale in terms of arrival numbers but also diverse in terms of origin and nationality. Our panel is set to address this special encounter of large scale tourism in small scale societies from various angles: How does large scale tourism affect and transform those various local practices? How do tourists become entangled in local networks? To what extent does tourism contribute to and alter strategies of economic development on a local or national level? In what sense are tourists the "global subject" of development strategies by local individuals? We welcome papers from all areas and encourage a focus on the notion of scale from a historical perspective that takes on issues dating back to the origins of large scale tourism in small scale societies.