D1
Lifestyle migration and residential tourism: new forms of mobility between tourism and migration

Convenors:
Karen O'Reilly (Loughborough University)
Christopher Thorpe (Aberdeen University)
Stream:
Series D: Mobilities
Location:
GCG09/10
Start time:
11 April, 2007 at 14:30
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

This panel connects tourism, travel and migration by examining affluence and lifestyle migrants. We explore causal links, motivations, and mobility experiences and frame these in the context of broader debates around nation and place. This can include reflections on the ethnography of mobility.

Long abstract:

New, flexible forms of mobility that connect and blur the distinction between tourism and migration intimate profound methodological and conceptual issues for anthropology. Here we are thinking about, for examples, North Europeans (British, Swedish, Norwegian, German) moving South; French buying second homes in Morocco, US citizens retiring to Mexico, or even students on a gap year. Affluent migrants migrate, oscillate, circulate or tour between their home and host countries in search of something encapsulated in the notion of the rural idyll or signified in the distinction between tourism and travel. Some retain a home in more than one place, some work in one place and live in another; others simply move, while others still simply visit. Their motivations are often anti-urban or anti-modern. They illustrate new trends, each with its own unique set of historical precedents and objective conditions, but are they a continuum of old themes, of the Grand Tour, colonialism and empire, travel and escape? Is their migration best explained through their individual motivations or through the conceptual lens of globalisation, world systems, transnationalism and diaspora, or even liquid/fluid modernity? What are the impacts for geographical and border spaces, and for host and home communities? We are seeking substantive papers that connect tourism, travel and migration, and that examine causal links, objective conditions, motivations, and/or mobility experiences and frame these in the context of broader debates around nation and place. We also welcome methodological reflections on the ethnography of mobility.