Accepted paper:

Religious practices among amis aborigine migrants in Taiwan

Author:

Shu-Ling Yeh (National Taitung University)

Paper short abstract:

I explore how Amis religious practices in urban areas replicate familiar homeland landscapes in new places of settlements and open a space for affirmation of a shared religious tradition. Observations on these practices can also open interesting discussion about the new religious developments in Taiwan.

Paper long abstract:

The harvest festival, rife with meaning and value, began to flourish in Taiwan when the Amis migrated to other parts of the country. Although the duration, hosting methods, meaning, and values of the city- and joint-type festivals differ from original-type harvest festivals, Amis migrants actively participate in the city-type harvest festivals and intertownship joint harvest festivals. In addition to practice their traditional rituals, Amis migrants also annually conduct the feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Catholic Aboriginal Day in metropolitan areas. This paper explores how Amis religious practices in urban areas replicate familiar homeland landscapes in new places of settlements and open a space for affirmation of a shared religious tradition and identity. These religious practices provide stability and ground in the process of settlement and adjustment often experienced as displaced and unstable. They also play a significant role in the ongoing transformation of space into a meaningful place of home. In addition, observations on these innovative religious practices can also open interesting discussion about the new religious developments in Taiwan, including incorporating many traditionally non-religious elements and developing a much larger scale than ever before.

panel Rel03
In search of faith: itinerant religiosities and negotiated moralities in Asia