P16
Himalayan Climate Change

Convenors:
Ben Campbell (Durham University)
Andrea Butcher (University of Helsinki)
Format:
Panels
Location:
Senate House - Court Room
Start time:
28 May, 2016 at 14:30
Session slots:
1

Short abstract:

The panel invites anthropological analysis of climate science, its evidence and policy discourse in Himalayan regions, and how institutional interventions interact with local material and interpretive contexts.

Long abstract:

Anthropology can engage with observable processes and lived experiences of Himalayan climate change. The panel invites anthropologists' analysis of climate science, its evidence and policy discourse in Himalayan regions, and how institutional interventions interact with local material and interpretive contexts. These include political economic change as well as vernacular registers of rains, droughts, and moral narratives. The impact of Himalayan climate change and its discursive social uptake is extremely variable, as are engagements with the Anthropocene. Even for scholars not environmentally trained, anthropological theories and methodologies offer critical focus to climate and conservation policy worlds, allowing them to understand and measure the wider social or cosmological complexities that affect the outcomes of their interventions. In what surprising locations can we perhaps find narratives of climate and environment? How can the observance of practices of everyday religion and the state contribute to understanding local perceptions of climate, conservation, and choices being made? Who are the "other" (non-human) participants in the political discourse of climate change that are not considered by external interventions? How do normative, managerial or hegemonic approaches to tackling climate change at local level open up new opportunities and close down others? Anthropologists can reflect on how altered livelihoods, loss of habitat, or territorial restriction impact resilience and sustainability of environmental interactions. In order to consider possible trans-disciplinary or trans-institutional collaborations, the panel welcomes papers from anthropologists contributing to projects of conservationists, engineers, governmental and non-governmental organisations working with climate change agendas.